Open4DE Spotlight on Austria: How European and National Levels Interact

Authors: Malte Dreyer, Martina Benz and Maike Neufend

Open Access is developing in an area of tension between institutional and funder policies, the economics of publishing and last but not least the communication practices of research disciplines. In a comparison across European countries, very dynamic and diverse approaches and developments can be observed. Furthermore, this international and comparative perspective helps us to assess the state of open access and open science in Germany. In this series of Open4DE project blog posts, we will summarize what we have learned in our in-depth conversations with experts on developing and implementing nationwide Open Access strategies.

From Open Access to Open Science: a European trend

Following the adoption of Open Access policies by numerous European countries in recent years, the trend is now towards the design of Open Science policies. Finland has already announced that it will publish an Open Science strategy in the near future, and France has already done so. Austria also attracted attention earlier this year, publishing a guiding paper that provides a roadmap for the implementation of Open Science in the coming years. Reason enough for us to take a closer look at how this paper came about and what the general state of Openness is in our neighboring country.

Our interview partner

We met Dr. Stefan Hanslik for a conversation about Open Science policy making in Austria. Stefan Hanslik is an expert on Open Access and Open Science at the Austrian Federal Ministry of Education, Science and Research (BMBWF) and acts as delegate in various scientific committees at European level. As Head of Unit for Technical Sciences, he is involved in the topics of data and research infrastructures. In addition, Stefan Hanslik has been active in the EOSC process since 2018: through this involvement he also came in touch with European initiatives on Open Science.

The European framework

The history of the development of Open Science and Open Access in Austria clearly demonstrates the importance of the European framework in which national research and publication infrastructures are situated. An example of this is the EOSC process, which initially started in Austria in 2016, among others in an informal group of representatives of universities and ministries. This group, the so-called EOSC-Café, that focused on coordination, information, reflection and consultation on European processes, allowed to find a common understanding of Open Science. The discussion of EOSC also led to the question of whether a national Open Science strategy was necessary and what it might look like. The Open Science topic finally received additional support during the Austrian EU Council Presidency in the second half of 2018, Stefan Hanslik informs us. „With the emerging discussions at EU level and the call for all member state countries to take Open Science-related measures, there was a willingness in Austria to become active. After all, no one wanted to risk infringement proceedings.” Finally, the commitment to the European Research Area was included in the principles of the current government, „a backbone for our Open Science activities, that was important tailwind.“ European measures have often a strong inward effect, one can sum up.

National factors

In addition to the activities of the EU, numerous national initiatives were also important for the development of Open Science in Austria: „The initiative originally came from institutions that had already called for more Open Science and Open Access activities in 2015 and 2016,“ Stefan Hanslik reveals. The Open Access Network Austria (OANA), consisting of representatives of Austrian universities, had already made a clear recommendation that Austria needed an Open Sccience strategy. In addition, in the process of European harmonisation in digitalisation, the Information Sharing Law was passed at government level. This initiative brought together several stakeholders, including the Wissenschaftsfond FWF. So why not continue working together right away? At this favorable moment, it seemed clear to all parties involved, that an initiative had to be taken in the field of Open Science. As is often the case, a policy process was also promoted by the favor of the hour.

Relevance of informal structures

The example of Austria illustrates very well what has already been made clear in the other contributions to this series: Policy processes are rarely driven by a single factor, but often by several stimuli. These can have a delayed effect and sometimes even partially contradict each other. The example of Austria shows that informal associations can play a key role in policy processes. For example, it was the EOSC Café, which was initially conceived as an informal grouping for the exchange of information on open science topics, in which ideas for the Austrian Open Access Policy were formulated. „Austria is not large and the university landscape is quite manageable“ states Stefan Hanslik. At the operational level, a particular challenge was to build consensus among the relevant ministries, the  Federal Ministry for Education, Research and Science (BMBWF), the Federal Ministry for Digitalisation and Economic Location (Bundesministerium für Digitalisierung und Wirtschaftsstandort BMDW, until 2020) and the Federal Ministry for Climate Action, Environment, Energy, Mobility, Innovation and Technogy (BMK).

In this process, the EOSC Café, this informal group, attained the status of a very important working tool. Because there, we were able to elaborate ideas, involve all the important players little by little and prepare the adoption of the policy. That would have been very difficult without this group and would have taken much more time.

The launch of the EOSC in Vienna in 2018 marked a turning point for this group and finally led to its institutionalisation. Today there are more working tools than the EOSC Café: An EOSC wiki and a productive EOSC Support Office Austria as well as Open Science Austria. In the meantime, EOSC Café Austria invites guests, including from the European Commission or other European countries and sees itself as an open forum. „The EOSC Café has established itself and is used again and again to deal with questions around Open Science. It is an Austrian melting pot of Open Science-affine people and very dynamic as a group,“ Stefan Hanslik tells us.

As before, this group is open: anyone involved in Open Science can participate. Amongst others, the TU Vienna, the University of Vienna, the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, the Natural History Museum Vienna and other institutions are involved.

The Austrian Strategy: Designable Framework, Supporting Measures

It was also with the help of this group, the EOSC-Café, that the Austrian Open Science Policy was initially created. This Policy serves as a framework helping individual institutions to develop their own strategies.  „The policy may therefore seem a bit like a toothless tiger“, admits Stefan Hanslik, “but the intention was to first bring all stakeholders to the table under the umbrella of agreeable guidelines. At the same time, it was clear all along that we wanted to keep the policy open for more elaborate positions that individual institutions, such as universities, already have and can develop further.“

Additionally, this Open Science Strategy is flanked by numerous practical measures: Activities around Open Science are financed and supported, for example by a funding program to support the digital transformation, in which more than 50 million euros are spent on 5 large projects. Although this program expires in 2024, Stefan Hanslik said that follow-up programs are already being considered.

Researchers, libraries and research funders

However, even well-funded programs are of no help if researchers do not agree. As in other countries, many researchers in Austria are very committed by heart. But – from Stefan Hanslik’s point of view – even more interesting are those who are not yet sufficiently informed. „There is a strong need to catch up across all sectors in our country,“ he diagnoses the situation. „For example, I recently had a conversation with a quantum physicist who had more questions than answers and a large need for information. That’s when I’m glad that Open Science Austria (OSA) exists. They set themselves the goal of tackling this, and reaching out into the finest roots of the research world, across all disciplines.“

Equally important and differently developed are the libraries. „We involve them, but with varying degrees of success“ notes Stefan Hanslik. The situation is different when it comes to research funders. “Here, Austria’s benefit is that there are only two funding agencies: the Fond zur Förderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung (FWF) and the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG). Both are committed to research infrastructure programs.” Stefan Hanslik emphasizes that they have successfully put a lot of thought into PlanS and have thus helped to shape the Austrian policy process.

Challenges

But policy processes are never over, as Stefan Hanslik remarks: „Our policy lacks examples and concrete measures for almost all topics.“ Another well-known challenge in the area of Open Science is monitoring. Here, too, helpful initiatives already exist at European level, such as the EOSC Observatory Monitoring System. „We will feed this monitoring system with our data and create a Country Profile. This will also influence budget decisions, because we want to know to what extent what needs to be funded. But there’s often a question about how to quantify certain Open Science activities.“

What can we learn from Austria?

Austria and Germany are similar in many respects. Both countries have well-developed and very active open access and open science networks, a level of knowledge on openness that varies from discipline to discipline, and a federal system that can help shape decisions and policy processes in a participatory way. In addition to these similarities, however, Stefan Hanslik points to some clear differences between Austria and Germany: „I feel envious when I look at the research infrastructure and the research data infrastructure in Germany“ he admits. But he also sees that Germany has other scale dimensions to deal with. This makes it more difficult, especially in a federal system, to get stakeholders, responsible parties at EU and at governance level at the same table and to coordinate different interests. For the development of a federal policy process in Germany, he advises to take a close look at actors who have been able to implement successful policy models in Europe. „That way, you can learn from each other.“ Indeed, it was precisely this intention that motivated us to conduct this and other interviews. However, a preliminary evaluation of our interviews and a discussion with representatives of the federal and state governments of Germany led to the conclusion that no policy model of another country is transferable to the complex German situation. On the other hand, the international comparison offers inspiration and points to aspects that would otherwise have been ignored. Austria’s early adaptation of the Open Science idea and its integration with the European Union’s science policy can provide helpful and interesting hints here.

Open4DE: Stand und Perspektiven von Open Access in Deutschland

Anmeldung zum Online Workshop

Wann: Donnerstag, 8. Dezember 2022, 9h30 – 12h30

Im Projekt Open4DE haben wir in Workshops, Interviews und Policy-Analysen den Stand von Open Access in Deutschland ermittelt und Vorschläge für den Weg zu einem bundesweiten Open-Access-Strategieprozess erarbeitet. Zum Projektabschluss möchten wir unsere Forschungsergebnisse zur Diskussion stellen:

  • Wie kann die weitere Open-Access-Transformation gestaltet werden?
  • Welche Maßnahmen könnten die Open-Access-Transformation beschleunigen?
  • Wie können zentrale Stakeholder in einem gemeinsamen Strategieprozess zusammenarbeiten?

Diese und weitere Fragen wollen wir in unserem abschließenden Workshop gemeinsam diskutieren. Unser Projekt wird mit einem Landscape-Report abschließen, der sowohl Lücken aufzeigen als auch Anreize und Potentiale darstellen soll. Darin enthalten ist ein Anforderungskatalog für einen nationalen Open-Access-Strategieprozess, in dem verschiedene Szenarien sowie Vorschläge für eine Roadmap berücksichtigt werden.

In diesem Strategieworkshop möchten wir eine übergreifende Vision sowie konkrete mittel- und langfristige Ziele, Prioritäten und Vorschläge für die nächsten Schritte entwickeln. Auf diesem Wege soll die Entwicklung und Implementierung einer Open-Access-Strategie vorangetrieben werden. Besondere Berücksichtigung findet dabei der breitere Kontextes der Transformation der Wissenschaftskommunikation und die Bedeutung von Open Science für die deutsche Wissenschaftslandschaft.

Weitere Infos und Berichte aus unserem Projekt finden Sie in der Kategorie Open4DE auf dem Open-Access-Blog Berlin.

Open4DE ist ein Verbundprojekt von

Wissenschaft – Politik – Akteur*innen: Die Open-Access-Transformation nachhaltig gestalten

Registrierung

26. Oktober 2022, 14h00

Die Wissenschaftspolitik spielt eine wichtige Rolle für das erfolgreiche Gelingen einer Open-Access-Transformation. Neben der Verabschiedung von Open-Access-Strategien auf Landesebene ist die Einrichtung von landesspezifischen Open-Access-Initiativen ein vielversprechender Ansatz. Diese Initiativen unterstützen die jeweilige Wissenschaftslandschaft und insbesondere die Hochschulen der Länder mit Expertise, Impulsen und Infrastrukturen. Die Vernetzungsstellen können als Intermediär zielorientiert auf agile Entwicklungen reagieren und eine Open-Access-Praxis ermöglichen, die alle Interessen ausgewogen berücksichtigt. 

Die Bundesländer Berlin, Brandenburg und Nordrhein-Westfalen verfolgen gerade diesen Weg. In der Veranstaltung werden die Motivation, die Konzepte und die Aktivitäten der jeweiligen Initiativen präsentiert. Anschließend diskutieren wir Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschiede, Best-Practices und Desiderate vor dem Hintergrund der Erfahrungen der Initiativen und der Teilnehmenden.

Dies ist eine gemeinsame Veranstaltung der Landesinitiative openaccess.nrw, dem Open-Access-Büro Berlin (OABB) und der Vernetzungs- und Kompetenzstelle Open Access Brandenburg (VuK) im Rahmen der Internationalen Open Access Woche 2022. Den Zugangslink erhalten Sie nach einer Registrierung über Webex.

Open Access in Deutschland. Stakeholder Workshop mit Bund und Ländern

Im Mittelpunkt des dritten Stakeholder-Workshops des Projektes Open4DE standen die Herausforderungen und Chancen der Umsetzung von Open Access aus Perspektive der Landesregierungen und des Bundes.

Am 26. Juni 2022 fand in den Räumen des Bundesministeriums für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF) in Berlin ein Workshop statt, in dem Vertreter*innen der 16 Bundesländer eingeladen waren, sich mit Vertreter*innen des BMBF über gemeinsame Standpunkte zu Open Access auszutauschen. Treffen dieser Art sind nicht neu; bereits seit 2019 findet ein Austausch in dieser Runde statt. Dieses Jahr konnte das Projekt Open4DE gemeinsam mit dem BMBF diesen Workshop in Präsenz organisieren und die Diskussion zum Status Quo in Deutschland mit ersten Projektergebnissen anreichern.

In zwei Vorträgen stellten Projektmitarbeiter*innen Forschungsergebnisse vor. Der Fokus lag dabei auf der Frage, was Deutschland in Hinblick auf eine nationale Open-Access-Strategie von anderen Ländern lernen kann und darauf, welcher Handlungsbedarf sich konkret auf Landes- und Bundesebene erkennen lässt. Am Nachmittag wurden gezielt gemeinsame Standpunkte diskutiert. Dazu wurden in zwei weiteren Impulsvorträgen die “Empfehlungen zur Transformation des wissenschaftlichen Publizierens zu Open Access” vom Wissenschaftsrat und das DFG Positionspapier “Wissenschaftliches Publizieren als Grundlage und Gestaltungsfeld der Wissenschaftsbewertung” vorgestellt.

Was kann Deutschland von anderen Ländern lernen?

Die Forschungsergebnisse basieren auf Interviews, die von Januar bis Mai 2022 zu Policy-Prozessen in acht verschiedenen Ländern mit Expert*innen durchgeführt wurden. Dabei wurden Fragen zum gesamten Policy-Prozess gestellt, angefangen von den Rahmenbedingungen über die institutionelle Verankerung, Kooperationen und Konflikte zwischen den Akteursgruppen bis hin zur Strategieentwicklung selbst, die mit Fragen zu Beteiligungsprozessen und der Funktionsweise von Arbeitsgruppen zur Entwicklung von Open Access Policies näher beleuchtet wurde. Bei der Auswahl der Länder (Finnland, Schweden, Litauen, Irland, Niederlande, Großbritannien, Frankreich, Österreich) wurde auf das Vorhandensein strategischer Abläufe geachtet, entweder in Form von nationalen Strategien oder in Form bestehender Diskussionen über eine nationale Strategie. Aus den Interviews ließen sich übergeordnete Themen extrahieren: Vorteile nationaler Strategien, Erkenntnisse zur Steuerung von Strategieprozessen und schließlich Herausforderungen und Zukunftsthemen.

Die Vorteile einer nationalen Strategie sind vielseitig und zeigen sich je nach Kontext auf unterschiedliche Weise. Für das föderal aufgestellte Deutschland stellt sich deshalb zurecht die Frage, welche Rolle eine nationale Strategie hier spielen kann. Am Beispiel anderer Länder sehen wir allerdings, dass unabhängig von den Rahmenbedingungen das Agenda-Setting bereits weitreichende Impulse gibt, die nicht nur auf Ebene der Institutionen, sondern auch bei Wissenschaftler*innen Aufmerksamkeit erregen. Zudem können mit einer nationalen Strategie Aktivitäten, die zahlreich, aber auf unterschiedlichen Ebenen angesiedelt sind, synchronisiert werden. Neben der Aufwertung des Themas wird auch die internationale Sichtbarkeit und Zusammenarbeit durch eine nationale Strategie gestärkt. Wichtig ist hierbei, dass die Wirksamkeit einer solchen Strategie immer nur im Zusammenwirken mit entsprechenden Maßnahmen Legitimation erfährt. In Bezug auf die nationale Strategieentwicklung in Frankreich erwähnte Pierre Mounier im Interview:

„Viele Jahre lang war Open Access eine Sache des persönlichen Engagements von Einzelpersonen innerhalb von Institutionen. Persönliches Engagement auf der Grundlage politischer Werte. Wenn man das tut, funktioniert es lokal, aber irgendwann erreicht man eine gläserne Decke. Man bekommt keine allgemeine Bewegung, weil es nur eine Sache von Einzelpersonen ist. Das hat sich in Frankreich wirklich geändert.“

Pierre Mounier, Deputy Director of OpenEdition; OPERAS; Member of the Open Science Committee at the French Ministry of Research, Frankreich

In Frankreich, das bereits den zweiten nationalen Open Science Plan veröffentlicht hat, ist die Steuerung dieser Prozesse am Ministerium für Wissenschaft und Forschung angegliedert. Dies ist jedoch nicht in allen Ländern der Fall. Dort, wo es nationale Infrastrukturen gibt, werden diese auch genutzt: In Irland wurde beispielsweise ein National Open Research Forum (NORF) gegründet, dessen Koordinator am Digital Repository of Irland angesiedelt ist und in Schweden sitzt das Lenkungsgremium an der Nationalbibliothek. Finnland stellt wiederum einen interessanten Sonderfall dar, denn dort wurde die nationale Steuerung von Open Science and Research (OScAR) vom Ministerium an die Federation of Finnish Learned Societies übertragen, was die Legitimität der Maßnahmen und Empfehlungen zunehmend erhöht hat.

Es lässt sich zusammenfassen, dass insbesondere die Herausforderung, möglichst Viele am Steuerungsprozess zu beteiligen, vielfältige Lösungsansätze benötigt. Ob durch offene Foren und Arbeitsgruppen, offene Phasen der Konsultation, über Anreizsysteme oder eine Konsultation über die Fachvertretungen: sowohl die große Heterogenität der Fächer und Fachkulturen als auch die Stärken und Schwächen unterschiedlicher Akteur*innen beim Thema Open Access bergen das Risiko in sich, dass ein nationaler Prozess ins Stocken gerät oder parallel laufende Entwicklungen auseinanderdriften. Deshalb gilt es aus einem Kreislauf herauszukommen, in dem die Verantwortung für den notwendigen Kulturwandel zugunsten der Open-Access-Transformation immer wieder bei den Wissenschaftler*innen gesucht wird, ohne einen nationalen Prozess der Teilhabe zu entwickeln, der eine politische Steuerung eben dieses Kulturwandels ermöglicht. Dabei sind es insbesondere Themen wie die Erweiterung von Open Access zu Open Science, offene Forschungsdaten und die Reform der Forschungsbewertung, die nur durch einen breit angelegten Prozess der Konsultation zielführend bearbeitet werden können.

Wo besteht Handlungsbedarf innerhalb der Open-Access-Landschaft in Deutschland?

Nationale Strategien sind also effektiv, erleichtern das Agenda-Setting und den internationalen Vergleich, bilden einen starken Bezugspunkt und ein Mandat für Maßnahmen auf Einrichtungsebene und erleichtern die internationale Zusammenarbeit. Was können Interessenvertretungen wie Bund und Länder zum Prozess der Entwicklung einer nationalen Strategie beitragen und was haben sie bereits beigetragen? Auch diese Frage wurde im Projekt Open4DE untersucht. Die Ergebnisse basieren auf einer Auswertung von Strategien und Policies von Einrichtungen, Wissenschaftsorganisationen, Landesregierungen und Fachgesellschaften sowie auf der Auswertung des Open Access Atlas Deutschland (2022), der im Projekt open-access.network am Open-Access-Büro Berlin entstanden ist. Dabei wurde für diesen Workshop der Fokus auf die Landesregierung als Akteurin in der Open-Access-Transformation gelegt und auf die Verantwortung, die dieser in den Dokumenten zugeschrieben wird.

Der Open Access Atlas Deustchland (2022) verzeichnet die Open-Access-Aktivitäten auf Bundes- und Länderebene. Es lässt sich feststellen, dass Open Access je nach Bundesland einen unterschiedlichen Entwicklungsstand erreicht hat. Bund und einige Länder haben Strategien verabschiedet oder planen diese, andere unterstützen Open Access durch Instrumente der Hochschulsteuerung wie in Wissenschafts- bzw. Hochschulentwicklungsplänen oder sie benennen Open Access als Handlungsfeld innerhalb von Digitalstrategien. Gezielte Maßnahmen reichen dabei von eigenen Landeseinrichtungen zur Vernetzung und Kommunikation über die Finanzierung von Publikationsfonds bis hin zu spezifischen Förderlinien. Hierbei zeigt sich nicht nur eine große Vielfalt, sondern es stellt sich auch die Frage, wie der “langfristige[…] Betrieb von Diensten über Bundesländergrenzen hinweg” gestaltet werden kann (DFG. 2018. Förderung von Informationsinfrastrukturen für die Wissenschaft). Diskutiert wurde die Frage auch im Workshop, denn zentrale Lösungen für bestimmte Herausforderungen zu finden, kann für eine breit aufgestellte und divers ausgerichtete Open-Access-Transformation von Vorteil sein.

Konkrete Aufgabe der Länder ist es, die Rahmenbedingungen für eine Open-Access-Transformation mitzugestalten. Zu diesen Rahmenbedingungen können unterschiedliche Maßnahmen gezählt werden. Im Projekt Open4DE konnten neben Infrastruktur, rechtlichen Rahmenbedingungen und Forschungsförderung sechs weitere Felder identifiziert werden.

  • Dazu gehört einmal die Verantwortung der Ministerien, selbst eine Open-Access-Praxis vorzuleben, denn häufig werden von Ministerien herausgegebene Dokumente ohne persistente Identifikatoren wie DOIs oder stabile URLs publiziert. Das Handlungsfeld offener Verwaltungsdaten (open (government) data) ist viel diskutiert, dabei sollte das Open-Access-Publizieren von Eigenpublikationen ebenso auf die Agenda gesetzt werden, sofern rechtliche Rahmenbedingungen dies zulassen.
  • Zum zweiten liegt die Verantwortung, den Mehrwert von Open Access für die Gesellschaft zu kommunizieren, auch im Bereich der Landeseinrichtungen. Häufig werden die Vorteile, die durch Open Access erzielt werden, auf Wettbewerbsfähigkeit und Innovation beschränkt, insbesondere wenn ein Mehrwert im Austausch mit der Wirtschaft gesucht wird. Dabei gilt es den Blick für Gerechtigkeitsfragen zu weiten und diese auch im globalen Zusammenhang zu verorten. Gerechtigkeitsfragen können im Bedeutungsfeld Open Access bspw. über einen demokratisierten Informationszugriff adressiert werden, der einen Mehrwert für die Gesamtgesellschaft generiert.
  • Drittens ist die Gestaltung der Teilhabe an wissenschaftspolitischen Prozessen eine der Aufgaben, an der Landeseinrichtungen maßgeblich mitwirken können. Die Zugänglichkeit von Forschung wird häufig auf Institutionen und deren Angehörige beschränkt, sollte aber für alle möglich sein, d.h. für Autor*innen und alle lesenden Personen. Zudem ist die Repräsentation von Wissenschaftler*innen ein Problem im Prozess der Konsolidierung von übergeordneten Strategien, d.h. es wird häufig für die wissenschaftliche Community gesprochen, aber diese ist kaum in Strategieprozessen repräsentiert.
  • Das Umsetzen von Empfehlungen ist dabei eine der Hauptaufgaben, denen Landeseinrichtungen nachkommen, bspw. indem Strategien und Policies auf Länderebene veröffentlicht werden. Diese Dokumente sind Ergebnisse eines zeitgebundenen Diskurses und bedürfen damit einer Aktualisierung. Policy-Prozesse sollten zu Ergebnissen führen, die dauerhafte Möglichkeiten der Beteiligung und Konsolidierung eröffnen.
  • Ein wichtiges Instrument, um den Erfolg von Open Access zu messen, sind die Berichtsstrukturen. Monitoring findet in einigen Ländern auf Länderebene statt, auf nationaler Ebene durch den Open Access Monitor (OAM) und an einzelnen Einrichtungen. Ziel ist es, das Publikationsaufkommen vollständig zu erheben. Das Problem ist hier allerdings häufig eine Verengung auf wissenschaftliche Artikel in Open-Access-Zeitschriften, die wiederum zu einer Verzerrung des Feldes führt. Eine Diversifizierung der Berichtsstrukturen auf verschiedene Publikationsformate und -praktiken bedarf weiterer Entwicklung und Implementierung.
  • Zuletzt liegt auch der Kulturwandel zugunsten von Open Access teilweise im Aufgabenfeld der Landeseinrichtungen, denn die Reputationsökonomie ist wichtiger Bestandteil dieses Kulturwandels und eine Veränderung bedarf einer systemischen Reform. Wie zuletzt durch das DFG-Positionspapier zu wissenschaftlichem Publizieren erläutert, geht es dabei um eine Veränderung der Qualitätssicherung, die nicht bloß auf einer Quantifizierung beruhen kann. Um qualitative Indikatoren für die Reputationsmessung zu stärken, kann ein Kriterienkatalog für die Bewertung von Forschungsarbeiten und Forscher*innen entwickelt werden, der vielfältig, objektivierbar und offen zugänglich ist und explizit Aspekte offener Wissenschaft einbezieht. Dieser muss zwar innerhalb der Wissenschaft entwickelt werden, eine Unterstützung dieses Kulturwandels muss jedoch auch durch Policy-Prozesse auf Landesebene geschehen. Hierzu gibt es bereits reichlich Empfehlungen, die auf eine Umsetzung warten, zuletzt die “Council conclusions on research assessment and implementation of open science” vom Rat der Europäischen Union (Juni 2022), das „Agreement on Reforming Research Assessment“ (Juli 2022) von der European University Alliance (EUA), Science Europe und der Europäischen Kommission sowie der zuvor publizierte “Paris Call on Research Assessment” vom French Open Science Committee (Februar 2022).

Ausblick: Eine nationale Open-Access-Strategie für Deutschland

Eine Diskussion über diese Themenfelder wurde bereits in den vorherigen Austauschrunden zwischen Bund und Ländern zu Open Access geführt. Dieser Workshop konnte dazu beitragen, die Rollen und Handlungsfelder der Stakeholder in diesem Prozess zu reflektieren und die Open-Access-Landschaft in Deutschland in ein internationales Verhältnis zu setzen. Das Projekt Open4DE plant für Dezember 2022 einen Multi-Stakeholder-Workshop, in dessen Rahmen die Projektergebnisse in Form von Empfehlungen und einer Roadmap für eine nationale Strategie vorgeschlagen und diskutiert werden. Dabei geht es in erster Linie um eine gemeinsame Perspektive für den weiteren Strategieprozess, an dem auch die Vertreter*innen der Landeseinrichtungen und des Bundes beteiligt sein werden.

Fachcommunities könnten Vorreiter sein

Im Mittelpunkt des zweiten Stakeholder-Workshops des Projektes Open4DE standen die Herausforderungen und Chancen der Umsetzung von Open Access aus Perspektive der Fachgesellschaften

Das Projekt Open4DE, Stand und Perspektiven für eine Open-Access-Strategie für Deutschland erhebt auf der Grundlage einer qualitativen Auswertung von Policy-Dokumenten den Umsetzungsstand von Open Access in Deutschland. Im zweiten Schritt entwickelt das Projekt im Dialog mit den wichtigsten Stakeholdern im Feld Empfehlungen für eine bundesweite Open Access-Strategie. Bereits im Januar fand in diesem Rahmen ein Workshop mit dem scholar.led-network Netzwerk statt. Am 24. Mai 2022 waren Vertreter*innen der Fachgesellschaften zu einer gemeinsamen Diskussion eingeladen.

Rund zwanzig Fachgesellschaftsvertreter*innen aus geistes-, sozial-, und naturwissenschaftlichen Organisationen waren der Einladung von Open4DE gefolgt, darunter viele, die insbesondere mit den organisationseigenen Publikationen befasst sind, aber auch Mitarbeiter*innen der Geschäftsstellen und Vorstandsmitglieder. Im ersten Teil des Workshops stellte das Projekt Open4DE seine Ergebnisse aus der Untersuchung des Umsetzungs- und Diskussionsstandes von Open Access und Open Science in den Fachgesellschaften vor.

Umsetzungsstand von Open Access in den Fachgesellschaften

Open Access setzt sich, verbunden mit unterschiedlichen fachlichen Publikationskulturen, in wissenschaftlichen Disziplinen ungleich durch (vgl. z.B. Severin et al. 2022). Während die Physik bereits in den frühen 1990er Jahren eigene Publikationsinfrastrukturen für die fachinterne Zirkulation von Preprints aufbaute (arXiv), spielt in anderen wissenschaftlichen Disziplinen bis heute die Monographie eine zentrale Rolle.

Abb.1. Am Anfang des Workshops wurden die teilnehmenden Vertreter:innen der Fachgesellschaften gefragt, mit welchen Aspekten von Open Acces Sie in ihrer täglichen Praxis zu tun haben. Die Antworten deuten bereits Schwerpunkte in eigener Publikationstätigkeit an

Förderlich für die Aufgeschlossenheit gegenüber Open Access ist ein hoher Nutzen des offenen Zugangs zu digitalisierten Daten (wie z.B. in der Archäologie). Auch die transnationale Vernetzung von Fachdisziplinen mit ärmeren Ländern fördert die Akzeptanz von Open Access. Teilweise sind es eher die kleinen Fächer, die Vorreiter von Open Access und Open Science sind, da sie besonders von einer höheren Sichtbarkeit und einer freien Dissemination ihrer Daten profitieren (vgl. Arbeitsstelle kleiner Fächer 2020).

Policy-Papiere mit konkreten Handlungsanleitungen zur Umsetzung von Open Access haben Fachgesellschaften nicht verabschiedet. Einige Fachgesellschaften bringen sich aber mit Stellungnahmen in die Diskussion um Open Access und Open Science ein. Insbesondere Plan S löste Debatten aus (vgl. DMV et al. 2019). Dabei steht die Sorge um die Zukunft des wissenschaftlichen Publikationswesens an erster Stelle.

Weitere Diskursanlässe sind die Transformation fachgesellschaftseigener Publikationen in Open Access (vgl. DGSKA 2021) sowie der Umgang mit (offenen) Forschungsdaten (vgl. DGfE 2017; DGfE/GEBF/GFD 2020; DGV 2018; Schönbrodt/Gollwitzer/Abele-Brehm 2017; Abele-Brehm et al. 2017; Gollwitzer et al. 2018, 2021). Letzteres zeigt auch, wie fachwissenschaftliche Selbstverständigungsprozesse von außen evoziert werden, hier durch die Aufforderung der DFG, disziplinäre Richtlinien im Forschungsdatenmanagement zu formulieren (vgl. DFG 2015).

Trotz dieser zahlreichen Einzelinitiativen bleibt festzustellen, dass sich die Fachgesellschaften insgesamt – von einigen bedeutsamen Ausnahmen abgesehen – eher wenig sicht- und hörbar in die Diskussion und Aushandlung von Open Access in Deutschland eingebracht haben. Unter den rund 750 Unterzeichner*innen der Berliner Erklärung von 2003 sind zahlreiche Universitäten und Forschungseinrichtungen aber nur vier Fachgesellschaften (Stand: 28. Juni 2022). Die Gelegenheit, die Open-Access-Transformation als Anlass zu nutzen, um wissenschaftliche Standards vor dem Hintergrund eines grundlegenden Wandels von Wissenschaft durch die Digitalisierung innerhalb der eigenen Fachcommunity zu diskutieren und damit diese Transformation aktiv mitzugestalten (vgl. z.B. Ganz 2020), wird bislang nur in wenigen Fachgesellschaften aktiv ergriffen. Das überrascht, da Fachgesellschaften Orte der Selbstorganisation und der Selbstverständigung fachlicher Communities sind (vgl. Wissenschaftsrat 1992). Finden in den Fachcommunities keine Diskussionen über Open Access und Open Science statt oder sind diese lediglich nicht sichtbar, weil sie nicht in öffentlichen Stellungnahmen münden? In jedem Fall bleibt festzustellen, dass die Entwicklung des Themas Open Access in den Fachgesellschaften noch viel Potential besitzt. „Fachcommunities könnten eine Vorreiterrolle einnehmen“, sagte ein Teilnehmende  in Hinblick auf die gegenwärtige Situation und benannte damit sowohl die Chancen als auch die Herausforderungen der wissenschaftsnahen Entwicklung des Themas Open Access.

Im Anschluss an diese Gegenwartsdiagnose wurden in unserem Workshop folgende Handlungsfelder identifiziert: 

  1. Die Ausgestaltung des wissenschaftlichen Publikationswesens in der Open-Access-Transformation (Geschäftsmodelle, Finanzierung, Publikationsformate).
  2. Qualitätssicherung, wissenschaftliche Anerkennungsverfahren und Reputationssysteme
  3. Die Definition der Rolle fachwissenschaftlicher Communities in der Open-Access-Transformation als Vertreter*innen und Sprachrohr ihrer Community in Governance-Prozessen.

Aus diesen Handlungsfeldern wurden im Anschluss in Arbeitsgruppen weitere Fragen, Maßnahmen und Empfehlungen abgeleitet:

Reputationssysteme

Ausgangspunkt der Diskussion in einer der beiden Arbeitsgruppen war die Beobachtung, dass Wissenschaftler*innen in erster Linie in möglichst angesehenen Zeitschriften und Verlagen publizieren wollen. Open Access sei demgegenüber eine nachgeordnete Frage, es bestünden zum Teil Vorbehalte bezüglich der Qualität. Angesichts des starken Drucks, sich durch Artikel in High Impact Journals zu etablieren, bleibe Open Access ein marginales Thema. Damit Open Access mehr Gewicht bekomme, müsse das Reputationssystem reformiert werden. Ob und wie Fachgesellschaften diesbezüglich eine Rolle übernehmen können, diskutierte die eine Arbeitsgruppe intensiv, während in der anderen Arbeitsgruppe die Meinung vorherrschte, dass Wissenschaftler*innen und ihre Organisationen selbst diese Veränderung aktiv betreiben müssten.

Die Bedeutung der Monographie

Ein wichtiger Faktor in der Open Access-Transformation ist insbesondere für die Vertreter*innen von geistes- und sozialwissenschaftlichen Fachgesellschaften die Bedeutung der Monographie. Bisher lagen die Schwerpunkte konsortialer Transformationsabkommen aber im Bereich der Zeitschriften. Mit Blick auf die Entwicklungspotentiale der Transformation des Monographienmarktes wurde unter anderem diskutiert, welche Rolle Verlage im Bereich der Qualitätssicherung haben. Bei genauerem Hinsehen, so die vorherrschende Meinung, seien es aber nicht ausschließlich die Verlage, die Qualität sichern, sondern häufig im selben Maße die Herausgeber*innen, die mit ihrem Namen für Qualität einstehen. Bemerkt wurde zusätzlich, dass Mittel für Open-Access-Bücher oft knapp seien. So stellte sich abschließend die Frage, welche fairen Lösungen für eine Finanzierung entwickelt werden können. Müssten Fachgesellschaften letztendlich selbst Repositorien und andere Infrastrukturen für die Publikation von Monographien aufbauen? Letzteres sei kaum leistbar. Als möglicher Weg, sich als Fachgesellschaft einzubringen, wurde schließlich die Publikation eigener Open-Access-Buchreihen benannt, die durch anerkannte Wissenschaftler*innen eines Fachgebietes herausgegeben werden.

Best Practices

In Bezug auf die eigene Rolle als Herausgeber*in von Zeitschriften wurden positive Erfahrungen und Handlungsmöglichkeiten geteilt: so durchläuft die Zeitschrift der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Sozial- und Kulturanthropologie (DGSKA) aktuell einen Transformationsprozess: auf APCs wird dabei verzichtet, die Finanzierung der Zeitschrift erfolgt durch die Fachgesellschaft, deren Mitglieder an der Entscheidung über die Umstellung beteiligt wurden und diese überwiegend positiv aufnehmen. Dies zeigt, dass jenseits von APCs auch andere Geschäftsmodelle möglich sind, z.B. durch konsortiale Finanzierungen, wie sie etwa in der Open Library of Humanities praktiziert oder in KOALA angestrebt werden. Über diese unterschiedlichen Möglichkeiten müsse das Bewusstsein bei den Autor*innen deutlich gestärkt werden.

Anreize zur Offenheit

Um eine Kultur der Offenheit im Publikationswesen – und dort insbesondere in der Qualitätssicherung – zu fördern, bedarf es also häufig einer verstärkten Informationsinitiative unter den Mitgliedern. Der Kenntnisstand zum Thema Offene Wissenschaft ist je nach Fachkultur unterschiedlich stark ausgeprägt. Einige Teilnehmende sprachen diesbezüglich auch von einem Generationenkonflikt unter den Mitgliedern, wobei jüngere Wissenschaftler*innen oft aufgeschlossener gegenüber Open Science und Open Access seien. Anreizsysteme können in einer solchen Situation den Kulturwandel befördern.

Ideen und Vorschläge für ein stärkeres Commitment zu offener Wissenschaft gab es viele in der Diskussion; teilweise wurde auf bereits praktizierte Maßnahmen hingewiesen. Insgesamt entstand auf diese Weise ein umfassendes Bild bereits existierender und geplanter Leistungen der Fachgesellschaften im Feld Open Access. Genannt wurde die Einrichtung von Publikationsfonds durch Fachgesellschaften, das Aussprechen von Empfehlungen für Qualitätskriterien für Zeitschriften oder die Vergabe von Preisen für Open-Access- und Open-Science-Projekte. Auch die Entwicklung von Konzepten für den Umgang mit personenbezogenen Daten sowie von Ethik-Leitlinien für Forschungsdaten könne Anreize für den Kulturwandel hin zu mehr Offenheit setzen.

Synergien schaffen

Im Allgemeinen äußerten viele den Wunsch, Konzepte und Leitlinien gemeinsam zu erarbeiten, denn finanzielle und personelle Ressourcen seien auch in den Fachgesellschaften knapp. Der Wunsch, Publikationsinfrastrukturen übergeordnet zu finanzieren, wurde mehrfach zum Ausdruck gebracht.

Gerechtigkeits- und Nachhaltigkeitsfragen

Diskutiert wurde auch, dass inzwischen zwar viele reputationsreiche Zeitschriften open access seien, die von ihnen verlangten Article Processing Charges stellten jedoch ein Problem für Autor*innen außerhalb gut ausgestatteter Forschungseinrichtungen dar. Deshalb stelle sich die Frage, wie nachhaltig die Finanzierung von APC/BPC-basiertem Open Access angesichts steigender Kosten und Publikationszahlen sein könne. Im Rahmen der DEAL-Verträge werden auch Open-Access-Publikationen in hybriden Zeitschriften finanziert. Davon profitieren z.T. auch Fachgesellschaften, die Herausgeber wissenschaftlicher Journals sind, wie die anwesende Gesellschaft deutscher Chemiker (GDCH). Doch auch dieses Modell wird kritisch diskutiert (vgl. Oberländer/Tullney 2021).

Die Rolle der Politik und der Forschungsförderer

Bezüglich der Empfehlungen an die Politik äußerten die Teilnehmenden den Wunsch, dass Forderung und Förderung (beispielsweise durch die Entwicklung vorhandener Infrastruktur) Hand in Hand gehen müssten: Teilweise sei es so, dass Fördereinrichtungen Vorgaben machten, während gleichzeitig die notwendigen (finanziellen und technischen) Rahmenbedingungen, um diese zu erfüllen, nicht bestünden. Hier sei erforderlich, dass mehr Rückkopplung stattfinde. Überhaupt sei es wünschenswert, dass Fachgesellschaften analog zur Nationalen Forschungsdaten-Infrastruktur (NFDI) auch im Bereich Open Access an einer Koordinationsstelle beteiligt seien. Hilfreich wäre es auch, wenn Verantwortliche in Politik und Fördereinrichtungen Checklisten aufstellten, anhand derer Open-Science-Standards abgeglichen und entwickelt werden könnten. Grundlegend müsse es darum gehen, Nachhaltigkeit im Wissenschaftssystem zu garantieren und transparente Kostenmodelle für das Publikationswesen zu entwickeln.

Die Rolle der Fachgesellschaften in der der Transformation

Immer wieder wurde im Laufe des Workshops das Selbstverständnis der Fachgesellschaften im Prozess der Transformation thematisiert. Brauchen (kleine) Fachgesellschaften angesichts der Open-Access-Transformation eine Strategie? Zumindest stellte sich die Frage, wie sie ihre Rolle angesichts der grundlegenden Veränderungen im Wissenschaftssystem (neu) definieren. Dies kann bedeuten, eine wissenschaftspolitische Rolle einzunehmen oder wiederzuentdecken. Zunächst ginge es aber, so einige der Anwesenden, darum, einen Überblick über die Entwicklungen im eigenen Fach zu erlangen und eine eigene Expertise zu entwickeln, um dann einen Verständigungsprozess mit den Mitgliedern anzustoßen. Zur Diskussion stand somit auch, wie Beteiligungs- und Verständigungsprozesse gestaltet werden könnten. Ferner wurde wiederholt diskutiert, ob Fachgesellschaften in der Lage seien, selbst verlegerisch tätig zu werden und welche administrativen und technischen Fragen sich daraus ergeben würden?

Den Abschluss des Workshops bildete der Ausblick auf den weiteren Projektverlauf. Dabei wurden die Teilnehmer*innen eingeladen, sich an einem im Herbst geplanten Strategieworkshop anlässlich des Projektabschlusses weiter an der Diskussion zu beteiligen. Dieser Aufforderung nachkommen zu wollen, erklärten sich in einer abschließenden Umfrage alle Anwesenden bereit.

Literaturangaben


Open4DE Spotlight on Finland – An advanced culture of openness shaped by the research community

Authors: Malte Dreyer, Martina Benz and Maike Neufend

Open Access (OA) is developing in an area of tension between institutional and funder policies, the economics of publishing and last but not least the communication practices of research disciplines. In a comparison across European countries, very dynamic and diverse approaches and developments can be observed. Furthermore, this international and comparative perspective helps us to assess the state of open access and open science (OA and OS) in Germany. In this series of Open4DE project blog posts, we will summarize what we have learned in our in-depth conversations with experts on developing and implementing nationwide Open Access strategies.

After starting this series with an article about Lithuania and Sweden, we now continue our journey around the Baltic Sea. Our next stop is Finland:

In a comparison of European Openness strategies, Finland stands out for its sophisticated system of coordinated policy measures. While other countries have a strategy that bundles different aspects of the Openness culture into one central policy, the Finnish model impresses with unity in diversity. The website of the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies, which was set up specifically to provide information on Open Science (OS), lists four national policies on OS and research in Finland. In addition to a policy for data and methods, a policy on open access to scholary publications and a policy on open education and educational ressources document activity at a high level. The openness culture in Finland targets all stages of scientific communication but also teaching and learning. In addition, a national information portal provides orientation on publication venues, projects and publicly funded technical infrastructures. It is an exemplary tool to get an overview of the constantly growing Open Access (OA) and OS ecosystem and its numerous products and projects.

OA&OS-culture in Finland

Such an advanced stage in the development of openness can only be achieved through the persistence of political goals. The basis for this is a political and scientific culture whose fundamental values favour the idea of openness. OS and OA are seen as aspects of a comprehensive, science-ethical framework that unites issues such as internationalisation, gender equality and integrity of science in the term “responsible science”. In its guidelines Responsible conduct of research and procedures for handling allegations of misconduct in Finland the Finnish National Board of Research Integrity (TENK) establishes this connection between responsible conduct in science and openness. The 2012 version which is still valid today states:

2. The methods applied for data acquisition as well as for research and evaluation, conform to scientific criteria and are ethically sustainable. When publishing the research results, the results are communicated in an open and responsible fashion that is intrinsic to the dissemination of scientific knowledge (highlighting by the authors of this article).

“Responsible Science is an umbrella-term. Policy-making under this umbrella is based on the integrity of scientists, not on judicial decisions and laws,” says Sami Niinimäki, contact person for OS at the Finnish Ministry of Science and interview partner of Open4DE. In his role as a counsellor of education in the department of higher education and science policy in the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture Sami Niinimäki is well-versed in all issues related to science and education, funding and evidence-based policy-making. Quality assurance is also a defining theme for the ministry’s activities, Sami says. We meet via zoom on a Friday at the end of March to talk about Finland’s Open Science policy for an hour. A early spring day in Helsinki, Sami Niinimäki tells about the history of Finnish OS and OA policy-making: 

Data as a starting point

“We started with the data. In other places, it begins with publications but in Finland we invested first in the data infrastructure” says Sami Niinimäki, naming a special feature of the development of OA in Finland right at the beginning of our conversation. First discussions about opening up science date back to the 1990s, when people were aware of the benefits of OA&OS but had not yet pushed ahead with the development at a larger scale. The topic became prominent in the 2000s when the ministry, which at that time was responsible for the system architecture of science communication, realised that open data also represented an exciting field of activity. The first ministerial initiative in this field began at the end of the decade and ran from 2009 to 2014. Among other things, it created the conditions for long-term digital preservation. Together with the open science and research initiative from 2013 to 2017, these programmes created infrastructures, researched scientific cultures and conducted surveys on the maturity of OA and OS developments. Researching the field led to a kind of friendly competition among institutional actors and, at the level of individual institutions, had the positive effect of making their own openness culture thematically and publicly transparent, Sami Niinimäki tells us.

From the Ministry to the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies

The actual policy process, in which research funders, universities, colleges and other institutions work on national policy documents, is today coordinated by the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies, a national co-operative body for learned societies in Finland. According to its own information, the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies has a membership of 293 societies and four academies from all branches of arts and sciences, in total 260 000 individual members, and also supports and develops the role of its members in science policy discussions. Expert groups on science policy issues meet under its umbrella, currently these are “The Committee for Public Information”, “The Finnish Advisory Board on Research Integrity”, which is under the self-governance of the scientific community, and the “Publication Forum”. In addition, the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies is active in creating roadmaps and organises so-called forum meetings. “The change of responsibility for our policy process from the Ministry to the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies was a kind of natural evolution”, Sami Niinimäki points out. But in retrospect, this development made total sense:

“The Federation of Finnish Learned Societies hosts the research integrity board since the 1990s and their work relies on the integrity in the research community: why not include OS in a visible way in the same package? Possibly this happened per accident, but we had to go through these steps to reach a higher maturity level. In the ministry we failed to reach the research community, our audience included the same 400 people we talked to every time and with the Federation, the message reached further audiences, even trade unions.”

The change of responsibilities, the inclusion of new actors and the re-organisation of running processes is nothing new in the eyes of policy research. According to Sybille Münch’s Research on Interpretative Policy-Analysis (2016), policy processes rarely run as smoothly as the theory of the policy cycle suggests. In the Finnish case, however, the change of responsibility seems to have been achieved with little loss: Even more, the linking of the policy process to the research-community has led to productive participation of the target group. A manageable time commitment combined with the prospect of influence motivates stakeholders to this day to help shape policy processes through active committee work, says Sami Niinimäki.

During the interview, we repeatedly learn how important a culture of participation is for the Finnish model. Exemplary is not only the management of the policy process through an organization which represents the interests of scientists, but also the implementation of Plan S, which was informed by an open consultation at the University of Helsinki.

Problems and challenges

Problems do exist, however. In Finland, for example, the implementation of the European guidelines on the secondary publication right has failed – initial attempts in this direction failed in particular because of the resistance of trade union and copyright lobby groups. Sami Niinimäki is convinced that resistance in the community can be broken by communicating the goals clearly – often resistance is caused by misunderstandings. However, Finland compensates the absence of a legal basis by consistency in practicing green OA. “Our goal is to publish national OA journals on a common platform in journal.fi” says Sami Niinimäki.

The important function of repositories in Finland is well known and has attracted attention from German colleagues before. But it is not only the infrastructure that is important: Sami Niinimäki mentions research funding as another important challenge in the implementation of OA. Moreover, ultimatively, it always comes down to the decisions of researchers: “Researchers understand that they have to produce impact and this gives incentives to use open copyright licences.” The fact that it all depends on the scientists also applies to research evaluation, a central field of work for policy-makers as Sami Niinimäki states:

“When you look at all the issues each of them lead to the core of the assessment  problem. This needs to be solved. In Finland we are on a good way, research organisations have signed the DORA-declaration and we have a national policy on research assessment, wich is very much compliant with DORA.”

With the signing of DORA, Finland is a step ahead of Germany: here, only a few research organisations have signed this document. But much more can be done also in Finland. Following Sami Niinimäki, it would be desirable for a peer review to be seen as equivalent to a publication. At the very least, a way should be found to also map these activities in reputation-building metrics. A proposal that not only seems relevant and attractive for Finland. The EU has already taken up this issue, among others in its scoping report on research assessment systems.

Taking stock: what can we learn from Finland?

The Finnish path shows that OA is favoured by a publishing culture in which repository-based OA became the standard early on. Participatory processes also promote acceptance in the long term. The fact that OA and OS are supported by broad acceptance is not least because of the numerous opportunities for participation through which stakeholders can get involved in policy processes. As mentioned above, the formulation and enforcement of the rules of research integrity is in the hands of the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies – an organization representing the scientists. The participatory implementation of PlanS, also mentioned above, is also evidence of a culture of participation. “Starting point is the openness and transparency of science as well as the mutual trust between researchers and research organisations. The model of self-regulation works well in democracies akin to Finland” is written on the webpage of the Finnish National Board on Research Integrity. At the same time, an accompanying, careful regulation is also beneficial, says Sami Niinimäki:

“Research funders can call the play, if research funders show maturity, then the organisations that benefit from their funding also change their culture. It is a domino process. And this dynamic also played out at the European level.”

Whereas in Finland the rule of government is “as much as necessary, as little as possible”, the rule of self-government is “as much as possible, as little as necessary”. This creates a domino effect that develops a momentum of its own. Now, of course, with regard to Germany, the question is which dominoes must fall here in order to further advance the process of conversion to OA. Finland shows that the connection to researchers is of particular importance. In Germany, unfortunately, the professional societies have not yet played a leading role in the conversion to OA. A workshop, which was held with representatives of the professional societies as part of the Open4DE project, showed that the interests and needs of the individual professional societies are also very different.  Last but not least, a representative body similar to the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies is missing here, which would bring these different interests under one roof. However, networking nodes such as the Open Access Network could play a strategically exposed role here. The future will show how feasible the already outlined ways of involving scientists in Germany are.

Literature

Open Science Coordination in Finnland, Federation of Finnished Learned Societies (2020). „Declaration for Open Science and Research (Finnland) 2020–2025.” Accessed June 7, 2022. https://edition.fi/tsv/catalog/view/79/29/192-1.

European Commission (2021). „Directorate-General for Research and Innovation, Towards a reform of the research assessment system: scoping report.” Accessed June 7, 2022. https://data.europa.eu/doi/10.2777/707440.

European University Association asbl. (without year). „The EUA Open Science Agenda 2025.” Accessed June 7, 2022. https://eua.eu/downloads/publications/eua%20os%20agenda.pdf.

Finnish Advisory Board on Research Integrity. „Responsible conduct of research and procedures for handling allegations of misconduct in Finland. Guidelines of the Finnish Advisory Board on Research Integrity 2012.” Accessed June 7, 2022. https://tenk.fi/sites/tenk.fi/files/HTK_ohje_2012.pdf.

Ilva, Jyrki (2020). „Open access on the rise at Finnish universities“. Accessed June 7, 2022. https://blogs.helsinki.fi/thinkopen/oa-statistics-2019/.

National Open Science and Research Steering Group und Science and Research Steering Group (2020). „National Policy and Executive Plan by the Research Community in Finland for 2020–2025.“ Accessed June 7, 2022. https://avointiede.fi/sites/default/files/2020-03/openaccess2019.pdf.

Ministry of Education and Culture (2019). „Atlas of Open Science and Research in Finland 2019 Evaluation of openness in the activities of higher education institutions, research institutes, research-funding organisations, Finnish academic and cultural institutes abroad and learned societies and academies Final report.” Accessed June 7, 2022. https://julkaisut.valtioneuvosto.fi/handle/10024/161990

Morka, Agata and Gatti, Rupert (2021). „Finland“. In Academic Libraries and Open Access Books in Europe: A Landscape Study. PubPub. Accessed June 7, 2022.  https://doi.org/10.21428/785a6451.2da5044f.

Münch, Sybille (2016). „Interpretative Policy-Analyse: eine Einführung. Lehrbuch.” Wiesbaden, doi: 10.1007/978-3-658-03757-4.

Open Science and Research Coordination (2019). „Open Access to Scholarly Publications. National Policy and Executive Plan by the Research Community in Finland for 2020–2025 (1).” Accessed June 7, 2022. https://doi.org/10.23847/isbn.9789525995343.

Ministry of Education and Culture (2014). „Open science and research leads to surprising discoveries and creative insights: Open science and research roadmap 2014–2017.” Accessed June 7, 2022. https://julkaisut.valtioneuvosto.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/75210/okm21.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y.

Pölönen, Janne; Laakso, Mikael; Guns, Raf; Kulczycki, Emanuel and Sivertsen, Gunnar (2020). „Open access at the national level: A comprehensive analysis of publications by Finnish researchers“. In: Quantitative Science Studies, 17, 1–39. Accessed June 7, 2022.  https://doi.org/10/gg927d.

Open4DE Spotlight on Sweden: How a Bottom-up Open Access Strategy Works without a National Policy

Authors: Malte Dreyer, Martina Benz and Maike Neufend

Open Access (OA) is developing in an area of tension between institutional and funder policies, the economics of publishing and last but not least the communication practices of research disciplines. In a comparison across European countries, very dynamic and diverse approaches and developments can be observed. Furthermore, this international and comparative perspective helps us to assess the state of open access and open science (OA and OS) in Germany. In this series of Open4DE project blog posts, we will summarize what we have learned in our in-depth conversations with experts on developing and implementing nationwide Open Access strategies. We continue our series with a report on Sweden’s Open Access landscape.

The Nordic and Baltic countries of Europe are renown for having developed Open Access and Open Science (OA and OS) particularly well. Our spotlight on Lithuania at the beginning of this series made clear that committed policy-making is an important precondition for the successful implementation of OA and OS. Finland, too, has created a sophisticated system of various national policy papers on opening up research and teaching. The policy process in which they were developed is itself a tool to promote openness in science. We will report on Finland’s strategy in this series in the coming weeks.

Sweden differs from its Baltic neighbors as it has not established a nation-wide binding OA strategy through a policy paper or law. Nevertheless, Sweden has always been on a very good path towards the goal of opening up science. Sweden was one of the early adopters of transformative agreements and today can build on a broad acceptance of OA in the scientific community – despite the lack of a national policy. How can this be?

We wanted to explore what strategies Sweden is applying to make OA and OS a breakthrough and met Wilhelm Widmark to talk to him about the Swedish research ecosystem. Wilhelm Widmark is the director of the Stockholm University Library and has played an important role developing OA and OS at his own institution. He has also been involved for years in various national committees for the implementation of OA and OS: He is Vice-Chairman of the Swedish Bibsam Consortium and member of the Swedish Rectors Conference’s Open Science working group. Internationally, he was a member of the LIBER  Steering Board and a member of EUA’s Expert Group on Open Science. Since December 2021, he has also been a director of the EOSC Association.

The history of OA in Sweden

The history of OA in Sweden is characterized by very committed people, Wilhelm Widmark points out at the beginning of our conversation. Main drivers have always been enthusiasts who cared about the idea. One could therefore conclude that OA in Sweden has traditionally come from bottom-up. According to Wilhelm Widmark, it was indeed library directors who started it all, not the government. In their exchange forum, the SUHF Rectors Conference, they developed a recommendation in 2003 to deal more intensively with OA in the future, because they saw this topic coming. The already ongoing journal crisis gave a necessary impetus and lent the whole development an additional ideological dimension. In view of the constantly rising prices, it also became clear to the scientists that OA and OS has a value in itself. With the help of the libraries, they first tried to go the green way and started using repositories. However, it quickly became apparent that the workload on researchers was too high to achieve success this way. Only between 10% and 15% OA could be achieved with repository-based OA. Around 2015, therefore, the discussion about Gold OA also began to rise up in Sweden.

The plan to enable OA through negotiations with publishers led to discussions in the rectors conference. It quickly became clear that this form of negotiation could only take place with the involvement of university management. The network that emerged soon spanned the entire country. Today, there is a steering committee in which university rectors and people from the university administrations are represented in addition to the library directors. The National Library of Sweden, where the steering committee is located, plays a significant role in the transformation process, unlike in Germany, for example. The success of this model speaks for itself: Sweden is already one of the countries with the most transformation agreements. By 2026, more than 80% of publications are expected to appear in Gold OA through transformative deals.

The future of OA and OS in Sweden

The OA transformation is an ongoing process with changing goals. Wilhelm Widmark seems to get thoughtful at this point: “The question is when one can claim that a transformation is complete”, he remarks and points to upcoming challenges. These include the common search for alternatives to commercial publication service providers. An alternative to commercial OA could lie in the design of a publication platform. The times seem right for such projects: “Publishers really want to keep the transformative agreements as their business model. But the researchers are really annoyed of the high level of the publication fees” is how Wilhelm Widmark describes the current mood in his country. And in his view, the tested interaction between infrastructure providers and scientists will also be decisive for the next stage of the development: “The university management has the question on their table and the EU is our political driver. But it shouldn’t be organized top-down, it must be driven by researchers. The transformation is done for the researchers and thus the process must be created based on the needs of the researchers.” Under these conditions, the coordinating side needs to address the task of creating structures that promote and enable this cultural change.

Wilhelm Widmark believes that the involvement of all stakeholders is also necessary in those areas where he believes Sweden still has potential for development. Here he mentions, among other things, the topic of open data and especially the monitoring of opening processes in this area, investments in digital infrastructures, the promotion of citizen science or the topic of open educational resources. Furthermore, investments should not only be made in material resources, but also in skills. Universities in particular are called upon to provide competent support for researchers through data stewards and their own training programs. But the training of trainers must also be further professionalised and accredited: “We need a curriculum for data stewards and career paths for this staff. Not only the infrastructure is important, the skills are almost as important as the infrastructure,” Wilhelm Widmark is convinced.

Sweden and the National Policy Plan

The deep conviction that policy processes must be thought of from the implementation point of view and should be shaped by the players who are at the beginning of the scientific value chain corresponds to a critical attitude towards national policies. In contrast, a national OA and OS policy developed with all stakeholders, as is currently being discussed in Sweden, runs the risk of becoming self-serving and binding important capacities: “In the beginning the government wanted an OA and OS policy. The research council and the national library suggested a common OS policy together with the universities and the directors. But I am not sure if it is the right thing to do because it will take a long time and the work to be done is actually more important than the policy itself.”

What we can learn from Sweden

In our conversation, it becomes clear to us what maxims this openness-strategy follows: Prescriptions from above are avoided. Instead, common ground is identified through discussions with all participants and differences are not emphasized. In order to achieve goals that everyone considers desirable, the tools for their implementation are decided at each individual institution or organisation. In this way, specific needs can be addressed and researchers and educators have the opportunity to participate directly in these policy processes. On the last point, the Swedish strategy seems similar to the approach taken in Germany.

The price of this autonomy and particularism at the institutional level is a great heterogeneity of measures. Wilhelm Widmark sees this himself: “The national library compared all the different OA policies, and they are not aligned at all”. But he continues straight away: “Everything important happens at the universities. And of course the research field provides norms, but the researchers are not really interested in these norms but care about what is going on at their universities.” The benefit of such a strategy is that the discussion about OA and OS is kept alive. Perhaps this effect has also contributed to the fact that OA and OS have been met with such broad acceptance in Sweden.

Further Reading

5 von 5: Mit Volldampf voraus in Richtung „Openness“: Kompetenzen und Infrastrukturen mit Perspektiven

Die Aufzeichnung der Veranstaltung ist über das TIB AV Portal verfügbar.

Von Anita Eppelin und Ben Kaden

Bericht zur Veranstaltung #5 in der Reihe: Quo vadis offene Wissenschaft? Eine virtuelle Open Access Woche für Berlin-Brandenburg.

Für das Gelingen offener Wissenschaft spielen wissenschaftsunterstützende Einrichtungen und dabei insbesondere Bibliotheken naturgemäß eine große Rolle. Wenig überraschend sind entsprechende Transformationsprozesse in diesen Einrichtungen im vollen Gange. Die Veränderungen sind grundlegend und betreffen Organisationsstrukturen ebenso wie die technische Infrastrukturen, die informellen Netzwerke gleichermaßen wie die formalen Rahmenbedingungen. 

Welche Kompetenzen brauchen also die Menschen, die in wissenschaftlichen Bibliotheken tätig sind oder sein werden? Was müssen sie wissen und können, um die im Zuge der Transformation auftretenden Veränderungen optimal und aktiv zu steuern und zu gestalten, und zwar idealerweise im Sinne von Offenheit, Transparenz und einer zunehmenden Durchlässigkeit zwischen Wissenschaft, Zivilgesellschaft und Politik? Und was bedeutet dies für die entsprechenden Infrastrukturen?

Über diese Fragestellung diskutierten am 25.3.2022 fünf Expert*innen aus unterschiedlichen Kontexten: Elisa Herrmann vom Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Ariane Jeßulat von der Universität der Künste Berlin, Antje Michel von der Fachhochschule Potsdam, Vivien Petras von der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin und Jan Hauke Plaßmann vom Ministerium für Wissenschaft, Forschung und Kultur Brandenburg. Die Veranstaltung bildete den Abschluss der fünfteiligen Reihe “Quo vadis offene Wissenschaft”. Die Moderation der virtuellen und mit 100 Teilnehmenden gut besuchten Veranstaltung übernahm diesmal Frank Seeliger von der Technischen Hochschule Wildau. Nachfolgend fassen wir einige der diskutierten Themen zusammen. 

Die Perspektive eines Forschungsmuseums

Als Leiterin der Abteilung Informationsbeschaffung und Informationsmanagement und damit auch der Bibliothek am Museum für Naturkunde – Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions- und Biodiversitätsforschung (MfN) hat Elisa Herrmann Personalverantwortung für ein circa 15-köpfiges Team. Sie betonte, dass das MfN als eines von acht Forschungsmuseen der Leibniz-Gemeinschaft schon länger die Prinzipien der Offenen Wissenschaft vertritt. 

Passend zur Rolle und zum thematischem Zuschnitt des Museums liegt dabei ein zentraler Fokus auf der gesellschaftlichen Verantwortung der wissenschaftlichen Community. Das Haus trägt dem sowohl über ein starkes Engagement im Bereich Citizen Science als auch über eine erst unlängst aktualisierte Open-Access-Policy Rechnung. Um die Wirkung der Policy zu verstärken, wurde eine Koordinierungsstelle für wissenschaftliches Publizieren an der Bibliothek eingerichtet, die Wissenschaftler*innen insbesondere beim Open-Access-Publizieren unterstützt. Weiterhin gibt das MfN drei eigene Open-Access-Zeitschriften heraus. 

Besonders interessant aus der Perspektive der Kompetenzentwicklung ist, dass das MfN bei Stellenbesetzungen Wert auf Erfahrungen und Kenntnisse zu Praktiken der offenen Wissenschaft legt, und zwar durchweg für alle Stellen in dieser Abteilung. Offenheit ist hier also nicht mehr ein separat zu bearbeitendes Thema, sondern eine Querschnittsaufgabe des gesamten Teams. 

Laut Elisa Herrmann strebt das MfN an, seine Sammlungen so offen wie möglich digital und vernetzt bereitzustellen. Erst eine solche Datengrundlage ermöglicht wirklich innovative Nachnutzungen. Auch die eigene Forschung im Haus wird durch die umfassende Digitalisierung maßgeblich unterstützt. 

In Hinblick auf die allgemeine, außerakademische Öffentlichkeit nutzt das MfN seine Datenbestände und Digitalisierungsaktivitäten, um ein Bewusstsein über die Arbeitsweisen der Wissenschaft zu erzeugen und um Diskurse zur Zukunft des Planeten anzustoßen. Dabei zeigen sich themenspezifisch auch Grenzen der Offenheit, etwa bei Objekten aus kolonialen Kontexten oder im Hinblick auf den Artenschutz. Erstere brauchen Sensibilität und Einordnung, zweitere müssen so beschaffen sein, dass sie zwar informieren, aber keine negativen Effekte beispielsweise durch die Offenlegung von Geodaten besonders schützenswerter Habitate und Fundstellen herbeiführen. Hier ist ein, wenn man so will, informationsethisches Austarieren zwischen größtmöglicher Offenheit und dem verantwortungsvollen Umgang mit diesen schützenswerten Interessen vonnöten. Die Richtlinie des Museums zur Massendigitalisierung orientiert sich daher am Nagoya-Protokoll

Die Perspektive der Kunst

Die erste Vizepräsidentin und Open-Access-Beauftragte der Universität der Künste (UdK), Ariane Jeßulat, betonte die Bedeutung von offener Wissenschaft für die Künste und die künstlerische Lehre. An der UdK sind sich Hochschulleitung und Bibliothek dahingehend einig. Für die Community in den Künsten entstehen durch Offenheit und Open Access bedeutende neue Möglichkeiten. Zugleich muss die Transformation zu Open Access jedoch gut kommuniziert werden. So ist nicht allen bewusst, dass Open Access kein “nice to have”, sondern einen grundlegenden Paradigmenwechsel darstellt. 

Hinsichtlich der Kompetenzanforderungen kommt es auf eine entsprechende Vermittlungsfähigkeit zwischen den unterschiedlichen Akteur*innen an, also auf eine hohe Kommunikationskompetenz. Dazu gehört im Fall der UdK auch ein besonderes Verständnis für das Material, dessen Komplexität sich oft von den klassischen wissenschaftlichen Publikationen anderer Disziplinen durch eine Verknüpfung von Material mit unterschiedlichem Schutzstatus und hoher Verknüpfung und Multimodalität auszeichnet. Die rechtlichen Fragen sind daher eine zentrale Herausforderung. Entsprechend sind urheber- und medienrechtliche Kompetenzen sehr nachgefragt. 

Für die UdK stechen zwei Infrastrukturpartnerschaften heraus: NFDI4Culture – Konsortium für Forschungsdaten materieller und immaterieller Kulturgüter, das die Fachcommunity im Umgang mit digitalen und offenen Kulturdaten sehr voranbringt, sowie das Open-Access-Büro Berlin als zentrale Anlaufstelle für Fragen zu Open Access und Open Science in der Hauptstadt. 

Der neue Absatz 3 des § 41 des Berlin Hochschulgesetzes, dem zufolge die “Veröffentlichung von Forschungsergebnissen durch die Mitglieder der Hochschulen […] vorrangig unter freien Lizenzen mit dem Ziel der Nachnutzbarkeit erfolgen (Open Access) [sollte]”, wird an der UdK als sehr hilfreich für die Etablierung von Open Access empfunden. Ein wissenschaftspolitischer Rahmen ist folglich ähnlich bedeutsam wie die Veränderung der Einstellungen in den Fachcommunities. Als dritte Stakeholder-Gruppe erwähnte Ariane Jeßulat die Verlage, die für die Kunst und künstlerische Forschung nicht nur eine informationsvermittelnde, sondern auch ein zentrale diskursbildende Rolle übernehmen.  

Die Perspektive der Ausbildung an der Fachhochschule Potsdam

Auch Antje Michel, Professorin für Informationsdidaktik und Wissenstransfer an der Fachhochschule Potsdam, hob die Bedeutung von Openness als zentrales Transformationsthema in der Wissenschaft hervor. Es ist offensichtlich, dass die wissenschaftliche Informationsversorgung heute vom Digitalen und dem Openness-Prinzip aus gedacht werden muss. Denn die Wissenschaftspraxis selbst befindet sich in diesem Wandel. Dies wirkt notwendigerweise transformativ auf die wissenschaftsunterstützenden Einrichtungen wie Bibliotheken aus.  

Antje Michel forscht selbst zu den, wie sie formuliert, “Gelingensbedingungen transdisziplinärer Forschung”. Die Perspektive reicht, wie für Fachhochschulen durchaus üblich, über die Grenzen der Wissenschaft hinaus in andere Funktionsbereiche der Gesellschaft hinein. In ihrem Fall geht es um den Wissenstransfer an der Schnittstelle zwischen Forschung, Kommunen und Unternehmen auf regionaler Ebene, was auch die Idee der Openness noch einmal anders interpretiert. Je nach Bereich unterscheiden sich die Wahrnehmungen. Neben der Transformation spielen also auch der Transfer und damit auch die wechselseitige Verständigung nicht zuletzt über die divergierende Interessen eine wichtige Rolle. So existiert beispielsweise beim Thema Open Data ein Spannungsverhältnis zwischen Idealismus und Verwertungsmodellen.

Dass nicht eine Lösung alles erfasst, gilt auch für die Wissenschaft an sich, denn diese ist fachkulturell sehr heterogen und in ihren Karrierestrukturen durch individuelle Profilierungsansprüche geprägt. Openness muss diese Rahmenbedingungen berücksichtigen.

Studiengänge wie die der Bibliotheks- und Informationswissenschaft sollten daher neben einer generellen Handlungskompetenz zur Förderung von Openness und den dafür nötigen digitalen Kompetenzen auch ein Verständnis für diese Rahmenbedingungen schaffen. Diese im Prinzip wissenschaftssoziologische Vertiefung ist jedoch für grundständige Bachelorprogramme eine Herausforderung. 

Auffangen lässt sich das möglicherweise ein Stück weit, indem man als Ausbildungseinrichtung selbst Offenheit möglichst selbstverständlich lebt. Die Fachhochschule Potsdam hat sich beispielsweise, so Antje Michel, zu einem “Soziotop für Openness” entwickelt. Neben dem Fachbereich Informationswissenschaften mit seinen Forschungs- und Lehraktivitäten finden sich dort auch Openness-Initiativen wie die Vernetzungs- und Kompetenzstelle Open Access Brandenburg und die Landesfachstelle für Bibliotheken und Archive, die sich ebenfalls sehr stark in Richtung digitale Offenheit entwickelt. Zu ergänzen wäre sicher noch der ausdrücklich auf Open Access, Open Data und Open Science ausgerichtete Lehrstuhl von Ellen Euler. 

Die Perspektive der Berliner Bibliotheks- und Informationswissenschaft

Das Institut für Bibliotheks- und Informationswissenschaft der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin,  in direkter Nachbarschaft  des Hauses Unter den Linden der Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin, konnte ab 2006 mit Peter Schirmbacher als Professor für Informationsmanagement einen zentralen Akteur im Bereich digitaler Forschungsinfrastrukturen und Open Access in Deutschland mit einem entsprechenden Schwerpunkt für Forschung und Lehre gewinnen. Diese Prägung wirkt heute fort und differenziert sich weiter aus, wie im Gesprächsbeitrag von Vivien Petras, Professorin und bis vor kurzem Direktorin des Instituts, deutlich wurde. Sie verwies darauf, dass sich auch ein wesentlicher Teil der aktuellen Forschungsschwerpunkte des Instituts (Infrastrukturen und Kulturerbe sowie Open Data, Open Science, Open Access) mit dem Themenfeld Offene Wissenschaft deckt. So hat sich eine bundeslandübergreifende Partnerschaft mit der Fachhochschule Potsdam im Rahmen des weiterbildenden Studiengangs “Digitales Datenmanagement” entwickelt. Dieser richtet sich an Menschen aus Einrichtungen der wissenschaftlichen Infrastruktur sowie Bibliotheken, Archive, Kommunen und die Wirtschaft. Die von Antje Michel betonte Schnittstellenkompetenz findet hier also direkt eine curriculare Entsprechung.

In der Bibliotheks- und Informationswissenschaft ist Konsens, dass Openness eine wissenschaftsimmanente Frage und ein zentrales Transformationsthema ist. Als ein Fach, das in gewisser Weise aus der Perspektive einer Wissenschaftsforschung die Kommunikationsprozesse wissenschaftlicher Disziplinen beforscht, sieht die Bibliotheks- und Informationswissenschaft Openness als wichtiges Forschungsthema. 

Auch Vivien Petras betonte, dass je nach Wissenschaftsdomäne oder auch nach Datenobjekt große Differenzen hinsichtlich Open Data bestehen. Eine Forschungsaufgabe des Faches und damit des Institutes läge also darin, Möglichkeiten, Grenzen und Lösungen für offene Daten mit dem jeweiligen analytischen Zuschnitt für die Wissenschaftspraxis zu identifizieren. 

Die Ausbildung kann ein entsprechendes Bewusstsein schaffen und methodisches Wissen vermitteln. Zugleich wies Vivien Petras darauf hin, dass ein dynamisches und komplexes Themenfeld wie Open Access und mehr noch Open Science nicht erschöpfend nach einer Kurslogik vermittelt werden kann, sondern eine berufsbegleitende Kompetenzentwicklung erfordert. Zu dynamisch ist die Transformation, und zu spezifisch sind die Anwendungsfälle. Wichtig sind daher Angebote zur Fort- und Weiterbildung.

Die Perspektive der Hochschulpolitik

Dass eine kontinuierliche Kompetenzentwicklung der Schlüssel für eine optimale Gestaltung der Open-Access-Transformation ist, ist auch im Potsdamer Ministerium für Wissenschaft, Forschung und Kultur des Landes Brandenburg (MWFK) bekannt. Aus guten Gründen ging der Einrichtung der vom Ministerium finanzierten Vernetzungs- und Kompetenzstelle Open Access Brandenburg ein Projekt zur Ermittlung entsprechender Bedarfe bei den Mitarbeitenden in den Brandenburger Hochschulen voraus. 

Darauf ging Jan Hauke Plaßmann, Leiter des zuständigen  Referats 23 beim Ministerium allerdings weniger ein. Für ihn war es wichtig, noch einmal generell herauszustellen, dass die Hochschul- und Wissenschaftspolitik im Land Brandenburg Openness, Open Access und Open Science als Schlüsselentwicklungen für Wissenschaft, Forschung und Hochschulen ansieht. In der 2019 veröffentlichten Open-Access-Strategie des Landes bekam diese Einstellung eine konkrete Form. Das Ministerium bekennt sich mit diesem Dokument ausdrücklich zur Förderung von Openness. Dies manifestiert sich in den in der Strategie beschriebenen und in der Umsetzung befindlichen Maßnahmen. Besonders greifbar wird dies anhand der Vernetzungs- und Kompetenzstelle Open Access Brandenburg.

Wichtig ist bei diesen Prozessen, dass Wissenschaft und Kultur nicht getrennt betrachtet werden. Hier würde sich auch eine Gemeinsamkeit zu den Open-Access-Aktivitäten auf Landesebene in Berlin zeigen, die ebenfalls Akteure des Kulturbereichs einbeziehen. Generell besteht in Bezug auf Open Access eine enge und fruchtbare Zusammenarbeit zwischen Berlin und Brandenburg. 

Das Ziel des der Aktivitäten im Bereich Openness ist für das Ministerium in Übereinstimmung mit dem Grundanspruch von Open Access, die Ergebnisse öffentlich geförderter Forschung auch so weit wie möglich öffentlich verfügbar zu machen. Folglich geht es nicht nur um Open Access als innerwissenschaftliches Phänomen, sondern ausdrücklich um den Austausch zwischen den Domänen Wissenschaft, Zivilgesellschaft und Politik. Öffentlichkeit und öffentliche Diskurse sollen auf diesem Weg fundierter und teilhabeorientiert, also inklusiv gestaltet werden. 

Aus Sicht der Kompetenzentwicklung würde dies eine Erweiterung der Rolle einer Vermittlung aus der Domäne der wissenschaftlichen Infrastrukturen heraus auf andere gesellschaftliche Teilbereiche bedeuten. 

Diskussion

Diese bemerkenswerte Erweiterung wurde in der anschließenden Diskussion nicht stärker vertieft. Der Fokus verschob sich noch einmal auf die Frage nach den infrastrukturellen Aspekten sowie weitere Fragen aus dem Orbit der Openness.

Ausgehend von Lücke zwischen dem ideellen Anspruch und der tatsächlichen Umsetzung von Openness eröffnete Vivien Petras eine bisher wenig systematisch adressierte Spannung, die sich aus der sehr interessengeleiteten Perspektive des kommerziellen Sektors auf digitale Daten- und Kommunikationsstrukturen ergibt. 

Insbesondere große Digitalunternehmen wie Google, Facebook, Amazon oder Netflix sind in der datengetriebenen Forschung (z.B. im Bereich Information Retrieval) sehr aktiv. Die Forderung nach Offenlegung von Daten und Algorithmen und nach Replizierbarkeit von Forschungsergebnissen greife hier aber nicht. Kommerzielle Akteure können naturgemäß nicht zu Openness verpflichtet werden und argumentierten häufig mit dem Wettbewerbsgeheimnis. 

Dies könne auf Einstellungsmuster von Forschenden zurückwirken. In jedem Fall vertieft sich die Asymmetrie zwischen öffentlicher Forschung und der der Industrie. Zugleich ist die Trennung keineswegs scharf, denn auch kommerzielle Akteure werben in großem Umfang öffentliche Fördergelder ein. Die damit finanzierte Forschung und Entwicklung fließt auch direkt in die Produktentwicklung ein. Im Rahmen des künstlerisch-kreativen Bereichs spielten laut Ariane Jeßulat wiederum andere Faktoren eine Rolle. Kokreationsprojekte mit Unternehmen seien hier von großer Bedeutung, jedoch durch die formalen Rahmenbedingungen an den öffentlichen Einrichtungen häufig erschwert.

Anschließend ging es um die Frage, ob sich der Diskurs zur Offenen Wissenschaft von der Auffindbarkeit von Forschungsinhalten zu deren Zurechenbarkeit und also der datenanalytischen und maschinenlesbaren Vernetzung verschiebt. Bibliotheken streben Interoperabilität und Verknüpfbarkeit von Metadaten laut Vivien Petras bereits seit langem an. Ariane Jeßulat wies darauf hin, dass es problematisch sein könne, wenn bibliometrische Daten als Grundlage für budgetrelevante Entscheidungen dienen. Dies gilt umso mehr dort, wo Leistungen schwer quantitativ erfassbar sind. Bibliometrische Analysen müssten daher laut Vivien Petras von den Akteur*innen verantwortungsvoll verarbeitet werden. Diesbezüglich kann das Leiden Manifesto als wichtige Orientierung dienen. 

Ausblick – Quo Vadis Openness?

Abschließend wurden die Wünsche der Diskutierenden für die weitere Entwicklung von Offener Wissenschaft zusammengetragen. Elisa Herrmann verbindet mit Offener Wissenschaft allgemein den Wunsch nach einer Stärkung des gesellschaftlichen Verständnisses für die Komplexität der Welt. 

Vivien Petras wünscht sich, dass das derzeit noch stark an Budgetlinien und individueller Profilierung ausgerichtete Evaluations- und Qualitätsbewertungssystem in der Wissenschaft, gemäß dem Anspruch und der Vision von offener Wissenschaft verändert wird. Zudem kann eine Offene Wissenschaft in der passenden Umsetzung dazu beitragen, Ungleichheiten auch zwischen Wissenschaftsregionen wie dem globalen Süden und dem globalen Norden zu reduzieren. 

Dass die Lücke zwischen dem Bewusstsein für Openness und entsprechenden Richtlinien kleiner werde, wünscht sich Antje Michel. Dafür sind ausreichende Ressourcen notwendig, da die Kompetenzen und Möglichkeiten für die Umsetzung im System nicht selbstverständlich vorhanden sind. Sie sieht Openness weniger als Selbstzweck, sondern als Strategie, um die Wissenschaft und die mit ihr in Beziehung stehenden Systeme durchlässiger zu machen. 

Ariane Jeßulat wünscht sich, dass der Transformation Zeit gegeben wird und dass das Bewusstsein für die Auseinandersetzung mit komplexen Autor*innenschaften und Kreativrechten bei künstlerischen Werken als Bedingung für das Gelingen von Offener Wissenschaft gestärkt wird. Es gibt in den Künsten historische gewachsene strukturelle Herausforderung, die zu bewältigen seien. Das gelingt nicht über Nacht.  

Für die Wissenschaftspolitik benannte Jan Hauke Plaßmann den Wunsch, dass mit den begonnenen Transformationsschritten perspektivisch erreicht wird, dass öffentlich finanzierte Forschungsergebnisse tatsächlich umfassend frei verfügbar und nachnutzbar sind. Es bewegt sich zwar viel, jedoch nicht alles, wie man es sich erhofft. Mit Transformationsvereinbarungen mit großen Verlagen wie etwa im Rahmen von Projekt DEAL werde deren Marktposition unter dem Label Open Access zusätzlich gestärkt. Daher ist eine Diversifizierung und Stärkung verschiedener, auch wissenschaftsgetragener Publikationsmodelle wichtig, um Effekte wie etwa die Doppelfinanzierung des Zugriffs auf wissenschaftliche Ergebnisse und kostenfreier Arbeitsleistung von Wissenschaftler*innen für kommerziell ausgerichtete Unternehmen zu reduzieren. Bei solchen Ansätzen könnte öffentliches Geld tatsächlich primär in die Erzeugung von Forschungsergebnissen und deren freie Zugänglichmachung fließen.

Fazit und Takeaways

Für die zwei Schwerpunkte Kompetenzen und Infrastrukturen lassen sich jeweils einige Aspekte für weiterführende Diskussionen mitnehmen. Ein wichtiger Aspekt ist, dass die Transformation zwar einen digitaltechnischen Rahmen hat, die eigentliche Verschiebung aber weniger technische Innovation bedeutet, sondern Kulturwandel. Das deckt sich mit der mittlerweile jahrzehntealten Grundidee von Open Access. Dass wir bereits 20 und mehr Jahre diese Idee reflektieren, unterstreicht noch einmal die Bedeutung des Faktors “Zeit”. Die Geschwindigkeit des technischen Fortschritts ist eine andere als die der Evolution der Einstellungen, Interessen und auch Kompetenzen. Mit den Studiengängen der Bibliotheks- und Informationswissenschaften zum Beispiel in Berlin und Potsdam gibt es zugleich Kompetenzzentren, die Fachkräfte für das, wenn man so will, Komplexitäts- und Transformationsmanagement zur Openness gezielt qualifizieren. Bibliotheken und, wie das MfN zeigt, auch Museen benötigen Mitarbeitende genau mit diesen Qualifikationsprofilen.

Zudem lassen sich Openness, Open Science und Open Access nicht mit einem Weg erreichen. Die Kunst und die Universität der Künste sind ein perfektes Fallbeispiel für eine Domäne, die zwar hochmotiviert Openness verfolgen möchte, für die aber viele Lösungen zum Beispiel aus der Preprint-Kultur der Naturwissenschaften nicht passen. Openness rückt Wissens- und Kreationskulturen zusammen, muss aber zugleich deren jeweilige Logik und Besonderheiten berücksichtigen. Dies gilt nicht nur für die Fachkulturen, sondern auch für informationsethische Aspekte wie die Teilhabemöglichkeiten, die nicht nur den lesenden Zugang sondern auch das Sichtbarmachen des eigenen Forschungsoutputs, also den Zugang zu Publikationsmöglichkeiten betreffen. Eine Diversität ist daher auch bei den Publikations- und Bereitsstellungsmodellen zu fördern. Die Wissenschafts- und Hochschulpolitik in Brandenburg und auch anderer Stelle weiß das und setzt entsprechende Impulse.

Der Stand von Open Access und Open Science Policies. Eine Diskussion am Beispiel Berliner Hochschulen

Von Maike Neufend

In Berlin haben aktuell 10 von 14 öffentlich-rechtlichen bzw. konfessionellen Hochschulen eine eigene Open Access Policy verabschiedet bzw. veröffentlicht. Die Freie Universität Berlin (FU, 5.5.2021) und die Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (HU, 26.10.2021) haben ihre Open-Access-Policies bereits einmal aktualisiert. Eine Übersicht aller Policies findet sich auf der Website des OABB.

Als erste Universität in Berlin hat die Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin am 9. Mai 2006 eine Open Access Policy verabschiedet. Rund zwei Jahre später veröffentlichte die Freie Universität Berlin ihre Open Access Policy, am 23. Juli 2008. Zuletzt haben auch die Katholische Hochschule für Sozialwesen Berlin (KHSB, 2021) und die Alice Salomon Hochschule Berlin (ASH, 6.1.2022) eine eigene Open Access Policy verabschiedet.

Aktuelle Open Access Policies – Beispiele

Obwohl Studien bspw. aus dem Projekt Open Access Policy Alignment Strategies for European Union Research belegen, dass verpflichtende Policies wirksamer als empfehlende sind (vgl. Swan et al. 2015, S. 20), werden Wissenschaftler*innen in Deutschland und Europa kaum ausdrücklich dazu verpflichtet, ihre Forschungsergebnisse Open Access zur Verfügung zu stellen (Gold oder Grün). Anstatt dessen wird eine Open-Access-Publikation gefordert oder empfohlen (vgl. Swan et al. 2015, 18). Die Uniersität Konstanz hatte erstmalig in ihrer Satzung zur Ausübung des wissenschaftlichen Zweitveröffentlichungsrechts vom 10. Dezember 2015 Wissenschaftler*innen dazu verpflichtet, ihr Recht auf Zweitveröffentlichung wahrzunehmen. Gegen diese Satzung klagen 17 Hochschullehrende der Universität Konstanz mit der Begründung, diese verstoße gegen das Grundrecht der Wissenschaftsfreiheit (Art. 5 Abs. 3 GG).

Ob es rechtlich bindende Veröffentlichungspflichten auch in Deutschland geben kann, hängt maßgeblich von den verfassungsrechtlichen Anforderungen ab. Dies erklärt auch die Zurückhaltung der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) und des Bundesministeriums für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF). Die zwei größten deutschen Förderinstitutionen für Wissenschaft fordern und fördern Open Access umfangreich, aber auch sie verpflichten nicht zur Open-Access-Veröffentlichung. In der Open Access Strategie des BMBF aus dem Jahr 2016 wird „Open Access als Standard in seiner Projektförderung auf[genommen]“, aber verpflichtet werden Wissenschaftler*innen beim Erhalt von Forschungsförderung dazu nicht (S. 8). Anders formulieren es europäische Forschungsförderprogramme wie Horizon2020, die ausdrücklich zur Open-Access-Publikation verpflichten.

Die Open Access Policies der Hochschulen sind wiederum nicht an Forschungsförderung gebunden und richten sich an alle Hochschulangehörigen. Allerdings verpflichten sich die Hochschulen selbst dazu, Eigenpublikationen, „sofern dem keine rechtlichen Rahmenbedingungen entgegenstehen, unter einer offenen Lizenz (vorzugsweise CC BY)“ zu veröffentlichen (HU Policy, 26.10.2021, Punkt 5). Ähnlich formulieren es auch die aktualisierte Policy der FU Berlin, und die Policies der KHSB und der ASH.

Im Vergleich zu den Policies der ersten Generation sind einige Inhalte hinzugekommen. In der Policy der HU von 2006 werden das Einreichen von Publikationen in OA-Journalen oder auf OA-Plattformen empfohlen und auf die Veröffentlichung von Pre- und Postprint-Versionen auf Publikationsservern verwiesen. Die aktuelle HU Policy „empfiehlt für Forschungsergebnisse die Erstveröffentlichung unter freier Lizenz (bevorzugt CC BY)“ und fordert „ihre Mitglieder auf, ihr Zweitveröffentlichungsrecht aktiv wahrzunehmen und alle Publikationen parallel oder nach jeweils geltenden Embargofristen ausschließlich über Repositorien zu veröffentlichen“ (Punkt 2). Des Weiteren wird den Mitgliedern der HU Berlin empfohlen, positiv auf das Reputationssystem von Open-Access-Publikationen einzuwirken, indem diese als Gutachter*innen oder Herausgeber*innen von OA-Publikationen tätig sind bzw. werden sollen (Punkt 4). Für die eigene Forschungstätigkeit sollen Hochschulangehörige den offenen persistenten Identifikator ORCID iD verwenden (Punkt 8). Darüber hinaus werden Hochschulangehörige in Form von Verlagsverträgen ermutigt, ihre Urheberrechte auch wahrzunehmen, indem sie nur einfache Nutzungsrechte an die Verlage übertragen (Punkt 3).

Die erste Open Access Policy der FU Berlin aus dem Jahr 2008 ist recht kurz gehalten, weist aber doch einige Besonderheiten auf. Auffällig ist, dass den Hochschulangehörigen für die Herausgabe von Open-Access-Zeitschriften eine eigene Publikationsplattform durch das Center für Digitale Systeme (CeDiS) zur Verfügung gestellt wurde. Heute betreut CeDiS über 30 Zeitschriften über das Open Journal System (OJS). Auch für Verlagsverträge empfiehlt die Policy den Autor*innen sich „möglichst ein nicht ausschließliches Verwertungsrecht zur elektronischen Publikation bzw. Archivierung ihrer Forschungsergebnisse zwecks entgeltfreier Nutzung fest und dauerhaft vorzubehalten“. Diese Klausel wird in der aktualisierten Policy (10.6.2021) noch deutlicher formuliert, indem bei Verlagsverträgen empfohlen wird, „lediglich das einfache Nutzungsrecht einzuräumen. Sollte das nicht möglich sein, wird empfohlen, sich das Recht auf parallele Online-Veröffentlichung im Refubium ausdrücklich vorzubehalten“. Neben dem Open Journal System (OJS), stellt die FU jetzt auch das Open Monograph Press (OMP) für Universitätsangehörige zur Verfügung. Wie die Open Access Policy der HU spricht diejenige der FU eine Empfehlung für Nutzung der ORCID iD aus und ermutigt ihre Mitglieder, „sich bei anerkannten Open-Access-Publikationsorganen in Herausgabe-, Redaktions- und Begutachtungsfunktionen zu engagieren“. In der Open Access Policy der FU wird zudem darauf hingewiesen, dass die Universitätsbibliothek „Hochschulangehörige bei allen Fragen des wissenschaftlichen Publizierens“ durch Beratung und Finanzierung unterstützt (Punkt 7).

Es sind mittlerweile Infrastrukturen wie Repositorien und Finanzierungs- sowie Beratungsangebote an vielen Hochschulen etabliert, so dass sich die Inhalte und der Tenor der aktuellen Open Access Policies, im Vergleich zur ersten Generation, verändert haben. Sie geben häufig eine Richtung vor, die auch den Diskussionsstand in der Open Access Community widerspiegelt. Dies zeigt sich beispielsweise in dem Zusatz, den die ASH in ihrer Policy anführt: „Das Engagement für nicht-kommerzielle Angebote wird besonders befürwortet.“ Im Allgemeinen ist die Aufforderung an Wissenschaftler*innen, das Ökosystem Open Access selbst durch ein gezieltes Engagement in Begutachtungs- und Herausgebertätigkeit zu unterstützen, begrüßenswert. Es zeigt jedoch auch, dass der Kulturwandel weniger durch verpflichtende Leitlinien seitens der Hochschulleitungen ausgebaut wird. Der Erfolg der Open-Access-Transformation baut weiterhin auf das Handeln einzelner Wissenschaftler*innen auf. Eine Möglichkeit für Hochschulleitungen das Open-Access-Publizieren der Hochschulangehörigen verantwortungsvoller zu unterstützen, ist die Anerkennung von Open-Access-Publikationen bei der Beurteilung wissenschaftlicher Leistungen. Obwohl dieser Aspekt bereits 2018 in 6 Open Access Policies deutscher Hochschulen benannt wurde (vgl. Riesenweber und Hübner, 2018), nimmt keine der hier besprochenen aktuellen Open Access Policies dazu Stellung.

Von Open Access zu Open Science

Im vergangenen Jahr wurden deutschlandweit die ersten Open Science Policies auf Einrichtungsebene veröffentlicht. Dazu gehören die Open Science Policy der Ernst-Abbe-Hochschule Jena (16.2.2021), die Open-Science-Richtlinie der Hochschule Anhalt (17.3.2021), die Open Science Policies der Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (13.10.2021) und der Universität Konstanz (24.11.2021). In den Policies wird mitunter gefordert, „alle Bestandteile des wissenschaftlichen Prozesses offen zugänglich und nachnutzbar zu machen“ und dies „in allen Phasen des Forschungsprozesses“ (vgl. Präambel, Universität Konstanz). Hier wird deutlicher, wie nicht nur das Engagement einzelner Wissenschaftler*innen die Transformation vorantreibt, sondern dieses Engagement als wissenschaftliches Leistungsmerkmal anerkannt wird bzw. werden soll. Die Universität Konstanz markiert diese Leistungsanerkennung in ihrer Open Science Policy als bestehenden Sachverhalt (Präambel). Die Friedrich-Alexander-Universität formuliert etwas detaillierter, dass die Einrichtung selbst für „[d]ie Einbettung von Open-Science-Praktiken in Rekrutierungs-, Forschungs- und Evaluierungskriterien“ verantwortlich ist (Seite 3, Punkt 3).

In Berlin wird dieser Blickwechsel ebenso gefordert: Das Berliner Hochschulgesetz, gültig ab dem 25. September 2021, legt unter § 41 Abschnitt 5 fest: „Die Hochschulen fördern die Anerkennung von Praktiken offener Wissenschaft (Open Science) bei der Bewertung von Forschungsleistungen im Rahmen ihrer internen Forschungsevaluation und bei Einstellungsverfahren“. Wie diese Forderung zukünftig in die Praktiken, Policies und Strategien von Berliner Einrichtungen Einzug hält, ist Gegenstand des weiteren Aushandlungsprozess, unter anderem im Rahmen der Hochschulverträge. Das Open-Access-Büro Berin hat im Auftrag von und in Abstimmung mit der AG Open-Access-Strategie für Berlin unter Leitung des ehemaligen Staatssekretärs für Wissenschaft und Forschung Steffen Krach und des Direktors der Universitätsbibliothek der Freien Universität Berlin Andreas Brandtner eine Empfehlung für eine Landesinitiative für mehr offene Wissenschaft in Berlin vorgelegt, die in diesem Blog in einer kurzen Fassung veröffentlicht wurde. In der Empfehlung für eine Landesinitiative Open Research Berlin streben die Berliner wissenschaftlichen und kulturellen Landeseinrichtungen gemeinsam an, die Förderung von Offenheit und Transparenz in Bezug auf den gesamten Forschungsprozesses im Sinne einer offenen Wissenschaft (Open Science bzw. Open Research) umzusetzen.

Die Universität Konstanz und die Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg haben mit ihren Open Science Policies primär den Bezug auf Handlungsfelder im Bereich der Hochschulen erweitert: Neben dem offenen Zugang zu Bildungsinhalten und Lehrmaterialien (Open Educational Ressources), der nachvollziehbaren Dokumentation von Methoden (Open Methodology), der Publikation von Forschungsdaten (Open Data) und Software (Open Source), der Publikation von Verwaltungsdaten sowie der offenen Wissenschaftskommunikation in und mit der Gesellschaft, wird Open Access als die uneingeschränkt zugängliche Publikation von Forschungsergebnissens zu einem Handlungsfeld von Vielen.

Ein Blick auf das Handlungsfeld Open Access innerhalb der Open Science Policy der Universität Konstanz zeigt, dass zwar wichtige Impulse aufgenommen werden, wie bspw. die Unterstützung offener Begutachtungsverfahren, doch werden diese Aussagen seitens der Einrichtung nicht mit verbindlichen Verantwortungsbereichen oder konkreten Unterstützungsangeboten untermauert. Die Friedrich-Alexander-Universität zählt hingegen das „Experimentieren mit Open-Peer-Review“ zu einer möglichen Open-Science-Praktik, die auch in Rekrutierungs-, Forschungs- und Evaluierungskriterien eingebettet wird (S. 3, Punkt 3). Ähnlich wie in den aktualisierten Open Access Policies der HU und FU wird auch dort die Verwendung von Identifikatoren wie ORCID iD empfohlen (S. 4).
Insgesamt bleibt der Verpflichtungsgrad zu Open Access in der Open Science Policy der Universität Konstanz hinter aktuellen Open Access Policies zurück. So wird die Erst- und Zweitveröffentlichung von Forschungsergebnissen (Goldener und Grüner Weg zu Open Access) nicht direkt adressiert, die Universität selbst verpflichtet sich nicht ausdrücklich zu Open Access in ihren Eigenpublikationen und ORCID iD findet keine Erwähnung. Auch die Open Science Policy der Hochschule Anhalt führt diese Open-Access-Praktiken nicht auf. Positiv hervozuheben ist jedoch, dass – ähnlich wie es die Alice Salomon Hochschule formuliert – auch dort Angehörige der Hochschule darin unterstützt werden, „verlagsunabhängige[r] Publikationsstrukturen“ zu nutzen (Abs. 4). Auffällig ist zudem, dass nur die Open Science Policy der FAU und die Open Access Policies der FU und der ASH selbst unter einer offenen Lizenz (Creative Commons) und mit einer doi (digital object identifier) veröffentlicht sind.

Den Erfolg von Policies bemessen?

Auch wenn Policies gemeinhin keine eigenen Quoten zur Bemessung von Open Access festlegen, formuliert die Open Science Policy der Friedrich-Alexander-Universität, dass die Einrichtung verantwortlich dafür ist, den Fortschritt von Open Science zu messen. Die Erhebung von Kennzahlen und die damit einhergehende institutseigene Dokumentation oder ein kooperierendes Monitoring müssen implementiert werden. In diesem Falle werden Hochschulangehörige darin unterstützt, ihre Forschungsergebnisse über das Forschungsinformationssystem FAU CRIS zu importieren, „mit einem entsprechenden Kennzeichen, ob es sich um eine Open-Access-Publikation handelt“ (FAU Policy).
Auch in Berlin werden Zahlen zum Bemessen des Fortschritts im Bereich Open Access erhoben. Die Open-Access-Strategie des Berliner Senats von 2015 formuliert unter anderem das Ziel, dass bis 2020 60% aller Zeitschriftenartikel aus wissenschaftlichen Einrichtungen in der Zuständigkeit des Landes Berlin im Sinne von Open Access zugänglich sein sollen. Die Zahlen des aktuellen Monitoring Berichts 2019 suggerieren, dass dieses Ziel höchstwahrscheinlich erreicht wird.

Doch wie kann die Quantifizierbarkeit von Fortschritt im Bereich Open Science über die reine Erhebung von Veröffentlichungen hinaus gehend bemessen werden? Diese Frage muss Bestandteil weiterer strategischer Überlegungen und einer offenen Diskussion, auch auf Länderebene sein. Das Open-Access-Büro beteiligt sich an dem Projekt „BUA Open Science Dashboards – Entwicklung von Indikatoren und Screening Tools für prototypische Umsetzung“ zusammen mit dem QUEST Center an der Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, um gemeinsam mit den Communities disziplinspezifische Indikatoren zu entwickeln, die neben Kriterien einen offenen Wissenschaftsparaxis auch die FAIR-Kriterien berücksichtigt.

Der Policy-Prozess als aktiver Kulturwandel

Häufig werden Aktualisierungen von Open Access und Open Science Policies sinnvoll durch Programme von Forschungsförderern wie der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) angestoßen (Putnings und Söllner 2022). Um die Möglichkeit eines dynamischen Policy-Prozesses zu etablieren, sollten diese einer Form der Aktualisierungspflicht unterliegen. Mit der Anpassung an gegenwärtige Herausforderungen und der Ausweitung der Handlungsfelder von Open Access zu Open Science können Policies als Prozess verstanden werden, in dem die Einrichtung einen gemeinsamen Standpunkt erarbeitet. Um einen Kulturwandel voranzutreiben, können Policies als verantwortungsvolle Positionierung der Einrichtung im Diskurs und als Motivation für die Forschenden dienen. Ob eine Policy auch Wirksamkeit zeigt, lässt sich jedoch nur durch den Erfolg von Open-Access- und Open-Science-Praktiken an den jeweiligen Einrichtungen bemessen.

Political Commitment toward Open Science: Open4DE Spotlight on the Open Access Landscape in France

Authors: Maike Neufend, Martina Benz, Malte Dreyer

Open access is developing in an area of tension between institutional and funder policies, the economics of publishing and last but not least the communication practices of research disciplines. In a comparison across European countries, very dynamic and diverse approaches and developments can be observed. Furthermore, this international and comparative perspective helps us to assess the state of open access (OA) in Germany. In this series of Open4DE project blog posts, we will summarize what we have learned in our in-depth conversations with experts on developing and implementing nationwide open access strategies.

The open access movement in France plays a vital role since the beginning in the European region. Already around the 2000s French research institutions launched the Revues.org platform (1999) – now OpenEdition – for open access journals primarily in Humanities and Social Sciences. In 2001 the Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) started running HAL open archive (2001), a repository open to all disciplinary fields. In 2003 the CNRS signed the Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities. During many years open access was a matter of personal involvement from individuals within institutions, says Pierre Mounier, deputy director of OpenEdition and coordinator of OPERAS:

The personal commitment based on political values works locally, but at one point you reach a glass ceiling. You don’t get that general movement because it is only a matter of individuals. It really changed in France…

In 2021 France has already published the Second National Plan for Open Science. Generalising Open Science in France 2021-2024. And during the recently held Open Science European Conference (OSEC) the French Committee for Open Science presented the Paris Call on Research Assessment, calling for „an assessment system where research proposals, researchers, research units and research institutions are evaluated on the basis of their intrinsic merits and impact […]“. In line with the general development across Europe, according to the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science and other policy papers, Open Science is no longer a question of few committed librarians, information scientists and researchers, but part of the national strategy on scholarly communication.

What can be achieved by a national strategy?

In Germany multiple stakeholders publish their own policies and strategies, committing to open access practices and values. Marin Dacos, national open science coordinator at the French Ministry of Higher Education, Research and Innovation, emphasizes that a national strategy is a strong signal no matter what, because multiple stakeholders receive concrete directions by such strategies. In addition, it might be more efficient to speak as a country regarding these issues, in particular at the international level, f.e. within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the European Commission and The Council for National Open Science Coordination (CoNOSC), a network of national coordinators in the UN-European region supported by SPARC Europe.

Looking at France, for certain topics national negotiations seem more convenient: Considering investment in green open access or diamond open access, it is more realistic to achieve progress on the national level instead of federal, local or institutional levels only. Setting open access on the national agenda allows for strategic planning. This argument is not only supported by the content of the two national plans for open science in France from 2018 and 2021, but also on the recently published Action Plan for Diamond Open Access „to further develop and expand a sustainable, community-driven Diamond OA scholarly communication ecosystem“. Prepared by OPERAS, PLAN S, Science Europe and French National Research Agency (ANR) the plan was commented by experts of a workshop sponsored by the French Ministry of Higher Education, Research and Innovation in preparation for the OSEC conference. A summary of this conference and links to recordings are available online.

The National Plan and its infrastructure

But how did the first national plan actually come about in 2018? After the election in 2017, Frédérique Vidal became Minister for Higher Education, Research and Innovation. Since 2017 Marin Dacos is open science advisor to the director-general for research and innovation at the French Ministry of Higher Education, Research and Innovation. He has been highly involved in the writing process of the French Open Science Plan. The open science committee was founded in 2019, consisting of a steering committee of open science, a permanent secretariat for open science (SPSO), colleges and expert groups as well as the forum for open science.

The steering committee meets 3–4 times a year to make strategic decisions related to the national strategy, acts as the Council of Partners of the National Fund for Open Science (GIS FNSO) and decides which initiatives to fund. The permanent secretariat headed by the national coordinator for open science gathers monthly to prepare the work of the steering committee, and to ensure the implementation of its conclusions. It coordinates the work of the colleges of the open science committee, oversees the editorial board of the ouvrirlascience.fr website, and monitors the progress of ongoing projects for the operational implementation of the national open science policy. The colleges and expert groups are standing bodies composed of experts on various aspects of the national open science policy. They review issues, propose guidelines, issue opinions, and initiate and lead projects. The forum for open science supports the committee by bringing in the experience of professionals from academia and research institutions. It provides a space for dialogue, exchange and development of shared expertise. As Morka and Gatti point out, the open science committee is one of the „main platforms where librarians engage in discussions on open access“.

Moreover, in the French case, a national fund (Fonds National pour la Science Ouverte, FNSO) is in place since the first National Plan on Open Science (2018) funded by „ministerial allocations and voluntary contributions from institutions of higher education, research and innovation, as well as contributions from foundations and patrons“. Through this fund the steering committee for open science can incentivize concrete projects to foster implementation of measures articulated in the national plan, „it helps to target specific actions, an important transformation effect to help move forward“, says Mounier. 48 projects have been selected by the steering committee, 22 projects in 2019 mainly on research infrastructures, digital platforms and editorial initiatives and 26 projects in 2021 focusing on editorial platforms and structures as well as editorial content. Beside the fact that the fund is limited in its financial power, it is an important addition for a successful implementation of a national strategy.

What is there to consider for the German landscape?

One important lesson to learn from France refers to the administration of open access within the ministry. Open science and open access is highly coordinated inside the ministry and thus funds are not administered differently for these closely linked topics. However, the level of diversity included in the French national strategy is something to look up to. This is also visible in how the implementation of the national strategy is monitored in France. One aim of the French national open science strategy is the objective of a 100% open access rate in 2030 and progress is monitored on the national level. But different from the German Open Access Monitor the French version relies only on „using reliable and controlled open data“ like data from Unpaywall, DOAJ or OpenAPC – source databases like Web of Science or Scopus are not included. In addition, the French Open Science Monitor aims at including all scientific output and thus shows not only open access articles published in peer-reviewed journals but proceedings, book chapters, books and preprints as well. Sorting according to disciplines and their open access output is presented and the language of publication is shown as well. It is positive to see that both, the German and the French monitor, include diamond open access and thus differentiate it from full APC gold open access already.

But what works well in France is not necessarily the right path for Germany. University presses are well-developed in France, while the national publishing platform OpenEdition provides an infrastructure to publish open access books as well as journals. In Germany a decentralized library system operates quite autonomous on institutional levels, with different library consortia across federal states. A national publishing platform like OpenEdition may look like a desirable model, but as Pierre Mounier points out, does it really make sense for Germany? An important impulse from our interviews with French open science experts has been the question, how we can use the federated infrastructure in Germany as an advantage and not an obstacle for a national open access agenda.

References

(2017). „Jussieu Call for Open Science and Bibliodiversity.“ Accessed April 6, 2022. https://jussieucall.org/jussieu-call/.

Ministère de l’Enseignement supérieur, de la Recherche  et de l’Innovation (2018). „National Plan for Open Science.“ Accessed April 6, 2022. https://www.ouvrirlascience.fr/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/National-Plan-for-Open-Science_A4_20180704.pdf.

Ministère de l’Enseignement supérieur, de la Recherche  et de l’Innovation (2021). „Second National Plan for Open Science Generalising Open Science in France 2021-2024.“ Accessed April 6, 2022. https://www.ouvrirlascience.fr/second-national-plan-for-open-science/,

Ministère de l’Enseignement supérieur, de la Recherche et de l’Innovation (2022). „Paris Call on Research Assessment.“ Accessed April 6, 2022. https://www.ouvrirlascience.fr/paris-call-on-research-assessment.

Ministère de l’Enseignement supérieur, de la Recherche et de l’Innovation (2022). „Action Plan for Diamond open access.“ Accessed April 6, 2022. https://www.ouvrirlascience.fr/action-plan-for-diamond-open-access-2.

Mounier, Pierre (2019). „From Open Access as a Movement to Open Science as a Policy.“ Presented at the 2019 2nd AEUP Conference: (Re-)Shaping University Presses and Institutional Publishing. Profiles – Challenges – Benefits, Brno, Czech Republic, October 3. Accessed April 6, 2022. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3471026.

Morka, Agata, and Rupert Gatti (2021). „France.“ In Academic Libraries and Open Access Books in Europe: A Landscape Study. PubPub. Accessed April 6, 2022. https://doi.org/10.21428/785a6451.6df6495e.