Open4DE Spotlight on Austria: How European and National Levels Interact

Authors: Malte Dreyer, Martina Benz and Maike Neufend

Open Access is developing in an area of tension between institutional and funder policies, the economics of publishing and last but not least the communication practices of research disciplines. In a comparison across European countries, very dynamic and diverse approaches and developments can be observed. Furthermore, this international and comparative perspective helps us to assess the state of open access and open science in Germany. In this series of Open4DE project blog posts, we will summarize what we have learned in our in-depth conversations with experts on developing and implementing nationwide Open Access strategies.

From Open Access to Open Science: a European trend

Following the adoption of Open Access policies by numerous European countries in recent years, the trend is now towards the design of Open Science policies. Finland has already announced that it will publish an Open Science strategy in the near future, and France has already done so. Austria also attracted attention earlier this year, publishing a guiding paper that provides a roadmap for the implementation of Open Science in the coming years. Reason enough for us to take a closer look at how this paper came about and what the general state of Openness is in our neighboring country.

Our interview partner

We met Dr. Stefan Hanslik for a conversation about Open Science policy making in Austria. Stefan Hanslik is an expert on Open Access and Open Science at the Austrian Federal Ministry of Education, Science and Research (BMBWF) and acts as delegate in various scientific committees at European level. As Head of Unit for Technical Sciences, he is involved in the topics of data and research infrastructures. In addition, Stefan Hanslik has been active in the EOSC process since 2018: through this involvement he also came in touch with European initiatives on Open Science.

The European framework

The history of the development of Open Science and Open Access in Austria clearly demonstrates the importance of the European framework in which national research and publication infrastructures are situated. An example of this is the EOSC process, which initially started in Austria in 2016, among others in an informal group of representatives of universities and ministries. This group, the so-called EOSC-Café, that focused on coordination, information, reflection and consultation on European processes, allowed to find a common understanding of Open Science. The discussion of EOSC also led to the question of whether a national Open Science strategy was necessary and what it might look like. The Open Science topic finally received additional support during the Austrian EU Council Presidency in the second half of 2018, Stefan Hanslik informs us. „With the emerging discussions at EU level and the call for all member state countries to take Open Science-related measures, there was a willingness in Austria to become active. After all, no one wanted to risk infringement proceedings.” Finally, the commitment to the European Research Area was included in the principles of the current government, „a backbone for our Open Science activities, that was important tailwind.“ European measures have often a strong inward effect, one can sum up.

National factors

In addition to the activities of the EU, numerous national initiatives were also important for the development of Open Science in Austria: „The initiative originally came from institutions that had already called for more Open Science and Open Access activities in 2015 and 2016,“ Stefan Hanslik reveals. The Open Access Network Austria (OANA), consisting of representatives of Austrian universities, had already made a clear recommendation that Austria needed an Open Sccience strategy. In addition, in the process of European harmonisation in digitalisation, the Information Sharing Law was passed at government level. This initiative brought together several stakeholders, including the Wissenschaftsfond FWF. So why not continue working together right away? At this favorable moment, it seemed clear to all parties involved, that an initiative had to be taken in the field of Open Science. As is often the case, a policy process was also promoted by the favor of the hour.

Relevance of informal structures

The example of Austria illustrates very well what has already been made clear in the other contributions to this series: Policy processes are rarely driven by a single factor, but often by several stimuli. These can have a delayed effect and sometimes even partially contradict each other. The example of Austria shows that informal associations can play a key role in policy processes. For example, it was the EOSC Café, which was initially conceived as an informal grouping for the exchange of information on open science topics, in which ideas for the Austrian Open Access Policy were formulated. „Austria is not large and the university landscape is quite manageable“ states Stefan Hanslik. At the operational level, a particular challenge was to build consensus among the relevant ministries, the  Federal Ministry for Education, Research and Science (BMBWF), the Federal Ministry for Digitalisation and Economic Location (Bundesministerium für Digitalisierung und Wirtschaftsstandort BMDW, until 2020) and the Federal Ministry for Climate Action, Environment, Energy, Mobility, Innovation and Technogy (BMK).

In this process, the EOSC Café, this informal group, attained the status of a very important working tool. Because there, we were able to elaborate ideas, involve all the important players little by little and prepare the adoption of the policy. That would have been very difficult without this group and would have taken much more time.

The launch of the EOSC in Vienna in 2018 marked a turning point for this group and finally led to its institutionalisation. Today there are more working tools than the EOSC Café: An EOSC wiki and a productive EOSC Support Office Austria as well as Open Science Austria. In the meantime, EOSC Café Austria invites guests, including from the European Commission or other European countries and sees itself as an open forum. „The EOSC Café has established itself and is used again and again to deal with questions around Open Science. It is an Austrian melting pot of Open Science-affine people and very dynamic as a group,“ Stefan Hanslik tells us.

As before, this group is open: anyone involved in Open Science can participate. Amongst others, the TU Vienna, the University of Vienna, the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, the Natural History Museum Vienna and other institutions are involved.

The Austrian Strategy: Designable Framework, Supporting Measures

It was also with the help of this group, the EOSC-Café, that the Austrian Open Science Policy was initially created. This Policy serves as a framework helping individual institutions to develop their own strategies.  „The policy may therefore seem a bit like a toothless tiger“, admits Stefan Hanslik, “but the intention was to first bring all stakeholders to the table under the umbrella of agreeable guidelines. At the same time, it was clear all along that we wanted to keep the policy open for more elaborate positions that individual institutions, such as universities, already have and can develop further.“

Additionally, this Open Science Strategy is flanked by numerous practical measures: Activities around Open Science are financed and supported, for example by a funding program to support the digital transformation, in which more than 50 million euros are spent on 5 large projects. Although this program expires in 2024, Stefan Hanslik said that follow-up programs are already being considered.

Researchers, libraries and research funders

However, even well-funded programs are of no help if researchers do not agree. As in other countries, many researchers in Austria are very committed by heart. But – from Stefan Hanslik’s point of view – even more interesting are those who are not yet sufficiently informed. „There is a strong need to catch up across all sectors in our country,“ he diagnoses the situation. „For example, I recently had a conversation with a quantum physicist who had more questions than answers and a large need for information. That’s when I’m glad that Open Science Austria (OSA) exists. They set themselves the goal of tackling this, and reaching out into the finest roots of the research world, across all disciplines.“

Equally important and differently developed are the libraries. „We involve them, but with varying degrees of success“ notes Stefan Hanslik. The situation is different when it comes to research funders. “Here, Austria’s benefit is that there are only two funding agencies: the Fond zur Förderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung (FWF) and the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG). Both are committed to research infrastructure programs.” Stefan Hanslik emphasizes that they have successfully put a lot of thought into PlanS and have thus helped to shape the Austrian policy process.

Challenges

But policy processes are never over, as Stefan Hanslik remarks: „Our policy lacks examples and concrete measures for almost all topics.“ Another well-known challenge in the area of Open Science is monitoring. Here, too, helpful initiatives already exist at European level, such as the EOSC Observatory Monitoring System. „We will feed this monitoring system with our data and create a Country Profile. This will also influence budget decisions, because we want to know to what extent what needs to be funded. But there’s often a question about how to quantify certain Open Science activities.“

What can we learn from Austria?

Austria and Germany are similar in many respects. Both countries have well-developed and very active open access and open science networks, a level of knowledge on openness that varies from discipline to discipline, and a federal system that can help shape decisions and policy processes in a participatory way. In addition to these similarities, however, Stefan Hanslik points to some clear differences between Austria and Germany: „I feel envious when I look at the research infrastructure and the research data infrastructure in Germany“ he admits. But he also sees that Germany has other scale dimensions to deal with. This makes it more difficult, especially in a federal system, to get stakeholders, responsible parties at EU and at governance level at the same table and to coordinate different interests. For the development of a federal policy process in Germany, he advises to take a close look at actors who have been able to implement successful policy models in Europe. „That way, you can learn from each other.“ Indeed, it was precisely this intention that motivated us to conduct this and other interviews. However, a preliminary evaluation of our interviews and a discussion with representatives of the federal and state governments of Germany led to the conclusion that no policy model of another country is transferable to the complex German situation. On the other hand, the international comparison offers inspiration and points to aspects that would otherwise have been ignored. Austria’s early adaptation of the Open Science idea and its integration with the European Union’s science policy can provide helpful and interesting hints here.

Open Access Update Berlin & Brandenburg 3/2022

von Sophie Kobialka

Dieser Newsletter wird gemeinsam vom Open-Access-Büro Berlin und der Vernetzungs- und Kompetenzstelle Open Access Brandenburg erstellt. Wir wünschen viel Freude beim Lesen.

Aus der Vernetzungs- und Kompetenzstelle Open Access Brandenburg

Schulungen zu Open Access. In den letzten Monaten führte die VuK wieder einige Schulungen zu Themen rund um Open Access durch. Ende Juni stellte Fabian Rack von iRights.Law die Basics zu den Creative-Commons-Lizenzen, die anhand von Praxisbeispielen mit den Teilnehmenden diskutiert wurden, vor. Die Schulungsmaterialien sind auf Zenodo verfügbar
Im September wurde von Anita Eppelin das Empfehlungssystem für Open-Access-Zeitschriften B!SON vorgestellt. Es wird im Rahmen des gleichnamigen BMBF-Projekts von der Technischen Informationsbibliothek (TIB) und der Sächsischen Landes- und Universitätsbibliothek (SLUB) in Dresden entwickelt. Während der Schulung konnten die Teilnehmenden das Tool ausprobieren und ihr Feedback für die Weiterentwicklung anbringen. 
Außerdem gab Anita Eppelin im Workshop, vom BMBF-geförderten Projekt open-access.network, „Open-Access-Transformation der wissenschaftlichen Buchproduktion aus der Perspektive von Institutionen“ einen Überblick über den Publikationsfonds für Open-Access-Monografien des Landes Brandenburg.
Anfang Oktober sprach Heinz Pampel, vom Helmholtz Open Science Office, über die Kommunikation von Open Access an Hochschulen und wissenschaftlichen Einrichtungen und führte dafür unter anderem 10 Tipps an. Die Folien sind hier einzusehen
Strategieentwicklungsworkshop. Nach drei Jahren Open-Access-Strategie für das Land Brandenburg stellt sich mittlerweile die Frage wie es weiter gehen soll. Die VuK, als eine Maßnahme aus der OA-Strategie, möchte diesen Prozess begleiten und veranstaltet daher Workshops in denen sich Stakeholder über weitere Schritte austauschen und mögliche Entwicklungen von Open Access in Brandenburg diskutieren können. 
Open Access Smalltalks. Das Format der VuK lädt einmal im Monat die OA Community in einer lockeren Runde zum Austausch und zur Diskussion über aktuelle Themen und Neuigkeiten rund um Open Access, vornehmlich in Brandenburg, ein. Eine Rückschau zu vergangenen sowie Ankündigungen bevorstehender OA Smalltalks finden sich auf der Webseite der VuK
Open Access Takeaways. Regelmäßig veröffentlicht Ben Kaden OA Takeaways mit Zusammenfassungen, Auswertungen und Impulse zum Open-Access-Diskurs. Eine Übersicht findet sich hier
Open Access Monitoring. Im November 2022 trifft sich erstmal die Arbeitsgemeinschaft „Open Access Monitoring Brandenburg“, um gemeinsam die Rahmenbedingungen für ein mehrschichtiges Open Access Monitoring zu besprechen. In den nächsten Monaten tauschen sich Vertreter*innen aus den acht Brandenburger Hochschulen und der Vernetzungs- und Kompetenzstelle Open Access Brandenburg dazu aus, welche Kennzahlen zielgerichtet in 2023 erhoben werden können. Eine Projektskizze liegt vor.
Geförderte Publikationen. Die VuK betreut den Open-Access-Publikationsfonds für Monografien des Landes Brandenburg. Bisher wurden drei Publikationen veröffentlicht, die hier einzusehen sind. Insgesamt wurden bereits 28 Publikationen bewilligt, 23 davon seit Beginn des Jahres 2022. Diese befinden sich noch im Publikationsprozess und werden mit ihrer Veröffentlichung ebenfalls auf der Webseite der VuK gelistet. 
Open-Access-Tage 2022 in Bern. Die VuK war diesmal auf den OAT22 mit einem Poster zum OA-Publikationsfonds für Monografien des Landes Brandenburg vertreten. Dieses ist auf Zenodo einsehbar
Ergänzung zum Länderdossier für Brandenburg. Im Juni 2022 wurden die Länderdossiers des Open Access Atlas Deutschland, der vom OABB im Rahmen des Verbundsprojekt open-access.network erstellt wurde, vorgestellt. Heike Stadler hat für das Land Brandenburg weitere Ergänzungen festgehalten

Aus dem Open-Access-Büro Berlin

Die Open-Access-Tage 2023 finden in Berlin statt. Die Open-Access-Tage 2023 werden an der Freien Universität Berlin vom 27. bis 29. September 2023 stattfinden und gemeinsam von zwölf Berliner Universitäten und Hochschulen unter dem Motto „Open Access: Visionen gestalten – 2023 in Berlin“ organisiert. Im Jahr 2003 wurde die Berliner Erklärung über offenen Zugang zu wissenschaftlichem Wissen und kulturellem Erbe verabschiedet. Wo die „Vision von einer umfassenden und frei zugänglichen Repräsentation des Wissens“ in 2003 begann, arbeiten die Hochschulen 20 Jahre später eng vernetzt und im Austausch mit außeruniversitärer Forschung sowie Kultureinrichtungen am Thema Open Access. Auf Basis dieser langjährigen Kooperation haben sich die Berliner Hochschulen gemeinsam erfolgreich darum beworben, im Jahr 2023 Open Access erneut auf die Bühnen der deutschen Hauptstadt zu holen. Die Koordination des Berliner Ortskomitees liegt beim Open-Access-Büro Berlin. Mehr Informationen in der Pressemitteilung.
Call for Participation zum Aufbau von Open Science Dashboards.: Im von der Berlin University Alliance (BUA) geförderten Projekt BUA Open Science Dashboards interessieren sich BIH QUEST Center und Open-Access-Büro Berlin für die Vielfalt von Open-Science-Praktiken in verschiedenen Wissenschaftsdisziplinen und wollen hierfür gemeinsam mit Partner*innen Indikatoren entwickeln, die in interaktiven Dashboards präsentiert werden können. Im ersten Projektteil wurde bereits ein FAIR Data Dashboard umgesetzt, das die Nachnutzbarkeit von Forschungsdaten an der Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin anhand der FAIR Data Principles evaluiert. Das FAIR Data Dashboard wird ausführlich in einem Blogpost vorgestellt. Wir sind noch auf der Suche nach Partner*innen aus den BUA-Einrichtungen: Wenn Sie mögliche Open-Science-Indikatoren vor Augen haben, bei deren Entwicklung und Visualisierung Unterstützung benötigen, dann freuen wir uns über eine Zusammenarbeit mit unserem Projekt.
Open4DE: Stand und Perspektiven von Open Access in Deutschland. Vor dem Hintergrund der Öffnung der Wissenschaft einschließlich ihrer Prozesse (Open Science) lässt sich das Themenfeld Open Access kontextualisieren und neu positionieren. Zentraler Gegenstand des BMBF-geförderten Verbundprojekts „Open4DE: Stand und Perspektiven einer Open-Access-Strategie für Deutschland“ ist dabei die Analyse der gegenwärtig angewandten internationalen Strategien und Leitlinien mit dem Ziel, sowohl Zusammenhänge explizit zu machen als auch Perspektiven für die Weiterentwicklung aufzuzeigen. Die bisherigen Zusammenfassungen und Analysen zu unseren Interviews mit Open-Access-Professionals im europäischen Forschungsraum können Sie auf dem Open Access Blog Berlin nachlesen: Finnland, Schweden, Frankreich, Litauen. Auch unsere Berichte zu den Stakeholder Workshops mit dem scholar-led.network, mit Vertreter*innen von Fachcommunities und dem Austausch von Bund und Ländern können Sie bereits auf dem Blog nachlesen.
Open4DE Strategieworkshop. Der letzte Workshop im Projekt Open4DE findet am 8. Dezember statt und ist offen für alle Interessierten. In diesem Strategieworkshop möchten wir eine übergreifende Vision für die zukünftigen Schritte sowie konkrete mittel- und langfristige Ziele, Prioritäten und Vorschläge entwickeln. Auf diesem Wege soll die Entwicklung und Implementierung einer Open-Access-Strategie vorangetrieben werden. Besondere Berücksichtigung findet dabei der breitere Kontextes der Transformation der Wissenschaftskommunikation und die Bedeutung von Open Science für die deutsche Wissenschaftslandschaft. Um Anmeldung wird gebeten.
oa.atlas. Im BMBF-Verbundprojekt open-access.network hat das Open-Access-Büro Berlin den oa.atlas erstellt, in dem Open-Access-Strategien und Services von Wissenschaftseinrichtungen in Deutschland erfasst werden. Die Beta-Version enthält Informationen über Universitäten sowie öffentlich-rechtliche und staatlich anerkannte kirchliche Hochschulen, der vier großen Forschungsorganisationen sowie der Universitätskliniken. Eine Karten-, Listen- und Detailansicht biete eine Übersicht über u.a. Open-Access-Beauftragte, Open Access Policies, Publikationsfonds für Zeitschriftenfonds. Ergänzend zum oa.atlas wurde im Sommer auch die Broschüre „Open Access Atlas Deutschland“ veröffentlicht, die den Stand zu Open Access in den Bundesländern kompakt und übersichtlich zusammenfasst. Es ist geplant, die Informationen in weiteren Versionen zu aktualisieren. Auch die Datensammlung des oa.atlas wird regelmäßig aktualisiert und sukzessive ergänzt. Sie möchten Informationen ergänzen oder Änderungen melden? Schreiben Sie uns eine Email an: oabb@open-access-berlin.de.

Ausblick: Berlin-Brandenburg

Open Access Week 2022

Vom 24. bis zum 30. Oktober bietet die internationale OAWeek eine Gelegenheit für die wissenschaftliche Gemeinschaft, sich über die potenziellen Vorteile von Open Access zu informieren, das Gelernte mit Kolleg*innen auszutauschen und eine breitere Öffentlichkeit zu informieren. Zum diesjährigen Motto #OpenForClimateJustice werden auf der ganzen Welt Veranstaltungen, Workshops und Vorträge organisiert, die sich mit der Zusammenarbeit von Klimabewegung und der internationalen Open-Access-Gemeinschaft beschäftigen.

Das Open-Access-Büro Berlin hat Veranstaltungen zur Open-Access-Woche an Berliner Einrichtungen auf dem Open Access Blog Berlin zusammengefasst und bietet selbst zwei Veranstaltungen an: Ein Get Together und Posterausstellung im Jacob-und-Wilhelm-Grimm-Zentrum zusammen mit dem Forschungs- und Kompetenzzentrum Digitalisierung Berlin (digiS). Diese Veranstaltung ist offen für alle Interessierten (um Registrierung wird gebeten). Und eine Online Veranstaltung zusammen mit der Landesinitiative openaccess.nrw und der Vernetzungs- und Kompetenzstelle Open Access Brandenburg (VuK) zum Thema: Wissenschaft – Politik – Akteur*innen: Die Open-Access-Transformation nachhaltig gestalten.

Außerdem organisiert die VuK gemeinsam mit der TH Wildau die zweite Veranstaltungsreihe von Quo Vadis – Offene Wissenschaft in Berlin und Brandenburg: Let’s Talk! Während der OAWeek 2022 wird demnach jeden Tag ein neues Werkstattgespräch mit Aspekten zu Offener Wissenschaft auf der Webseite der VuK über das AV-Portal der TIB veröffentlicht. Kooperationspartner sind die Bibliothek der TH Wildau, der Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund Berlin-Brandenburg (KOBV), der Berliner Arbeitskreis Information (BAK) und die Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Spezialbibliotheken (ASpB).

Aus den Einrichtungen

Brandenburg

Überblick über bisher veröffentliche Open-Access-Publikationen auf den Repositorien der acht Brandenburger Hochschulen in 2022:

BTU Cottbus-Senftenberg

Open-Access-Kurs. Die BTU bietet im Wintersemester 2022/23 einen Open-Access-Kurs sowohl in deutscher als auch in englischer Sprache an. Termine, Hinweise zur Anmeldung und weitere Informationen zum Kurs finden sich auf der Webseite der BTU

Universität Potsdam

Self-Assessment-Tool für Open Science. Ab November steht das webbasierte Self-Assessment-Tool zur zur strategischen Entwicklung und Profilschärfung von Open Science und Open Practices, für deren Entwicklung sowohl die Uni Potsdam, als auch die RWTH Aachen und die Ernst-Abbe-Hochschule 2021 innerhalb eines Projektes ausgewählt wurden, auch in englischer Sprache zur Verfügung. Weitere Informationen finden sich auf der Webseite der Universität Potsdam

Berlin

Berlin Universities Publishing (BerlinUP)

Neuer Open-Access-Verlag der vier BUA-Einrichtungen – erste Buchpublikation erschienen. Berlin Universities Publishing (BerlinUP) ist der neue Open-Access-Verlag der Freien Universität Berlin, der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, der Technischen Universität Berlin und der Charité − Universitätsmedizin Berlin im Zusammenschluss der Berlin University Alliance (BUA). BerlinUP nahm im Juli 2022 seine Arbeit auf und ermöglicht den Forschenden der vier BUA-Einrichtungen, die Ergebnisse ihrer Forschungsaktivitäten qualitätsgesichert und im Open Access in Büchern (BerlinUP Books) und Zeitschriften (BerlinUP Journals) zu veröffentlichen. Zudem unterstützt BerlinUP das Open-Access-Publizieren mit Beratungsangeboten (BerlinUP Beratung). BerlinUP wird von den Bibliotheken der vier BUA-Einrichtungen betrieben und engagiert sich aktiv für eine nachhaltige, qualitätsfokussierte und kosteneffiziente Transformation des wissenschaftlichen Publizierens zu Open Access. Unterstützt wird BerlinUP von einem wissenschaftlichen Beirat mit Mitgliedern aus allen vier BUA-Einrichtungen. Verantwortlich für den Verlag sind die Direktor*innen der Universitätsbibliotheken der Freien Universität Berlin, der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, der Technischen Universität Berlin sowie der Medizinischen Bibliothek der Charité. Im September ist das erste Buch bei BerlinUP erschienen. Veröffentlicht wurde das von Prof. Dr. Vera Meyer von der Technischen Universität Berlin und Prof. Sven Pfeiffer von der Hochschule Bochum herausgegebene Werk „Engage with Fungi“. In dem Buch werden vernetzte wissenschaftliche, künstlerische und zivilgesellschaftliche Forschungsvorhaben im Zeitraum 2020 bis 2022 vorgestellt. Weitere Infos gibt es in der  BUA Pressemitteilung.

Gemeinsames Programm der vier BUA-Einrichtungen zur Open Access Week. Zur diesjährigen Open Access Week veranstalten die vier Einrichtungen der Berlin University Alliance (BUA) eine Serie von online durchgeführten Talks und Kurzworkshops. Zum Fokusthema Open Access, dem freien Zugang zu wissenschaftlichen Ergebnissen, und verwandten Themen werden sowohl Gastreferent*innen vortragen als auch Vertreter*innen der Open-Access-Teams der Einrichtungen sowie von Berlin Universities Publishing (BerlinUP) zu Wort kommen. Koordiniert wird das Programm von BerlinUP. Das Programm bietet praxisnahe Beiträge zur Umsetzung von Open Access an den BUA-Einrichtungen (u. a. Finanzierungs- und Fördermöglichkeiten oder nachträgliches Open-Access-Veröffentlichen). Darüber hinaus befassen sich Gastreferent*innen mit den globalen Entwicklungen von Open Access und Open Science in Bezug auf Klimagrechtigkeit sowie mit Tracking als dem neuen Geschäftsmodell großer Wissenschaftsverlage. Es besteht auch die Gelegenheit, den neu gegründeten Verlag BerlinUP und dessen Angebote kennenzulernen.

Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin

Kostentransparenz an der Charité. Die Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin hat für das Jahr 2021 erneut Kostendaten für Zeitschriftenartikel an OpenAPC gemeldet. In diesen Daten sind Publikationen und Kosten enthalten, die im Rahmen des Publikationsfonds und Vereinbarungen mit Wiley und Springer Nature entstanden sind. Open-Access-Artikel, die mit Drittmitteln oder anderweitig außerhalb der Medizinischen Bibliothek finanziert wurden, sind nicht gemeldet worden.
Integration von ORCID an der Charité. In der Interviewreihe von ORCID gibt es nun Details zur Integration von ORCID an der Charité. Zum 01.08.2022 hatten schon mehr als 3.100 Forschende (seit Februar 2021) über das Forschungsinformationssystem FACTScience ihre ORCID iD registriert oder validiert. Mehr als 2.000 ORCID-Profile wurden mit Daten aus FACTScience aktualisiert. Dabei wurden 46.000 Publikationen sowie 1.000 URLs zu online Expert*innenprofilen übertragen. Ausführliche Informationen sind auf der Best-Practice-Seite von ORCID zu finden.

Freie Universität Berlin

Freie Unversität Berlin erhält DFG-Mittel für Open Access. Die Freie Universität Berlin hat im Rahmen des DFG-Programms „Open-Access-Publikationskosten“ im Mai 2022 Mittel zur Finanzierung von Gebühren für Open-Access-Zeitschriften und -Bücher beantragt. Dieser Antrag ist nun mit einem positiven Bescheid bewilligt worden. Mit dem Vorhaben verbunden ist ein umfassender Arbeitsplan zum Ausbau des Open-Access-Monitorings im Sinne eines umfassenden Informationsbudgets an der Freien Universität. Entsprechende Aktivitäten laufen bereits seit Anfang des Jahres. Ansprechpartnerin ist Dr. Christina Riesenweber.

Technische Universität Berlin

Kostentransparenz Transformationsverträge. Ergänzend zur jährlichen Lieferung der Ausgaben für Open-Access-Publikationsgebühren aus dem DFG-geförderten Publikationsfonds der TU Berlin an OpenAPC sowie der Kostendaten für OA-Bücher an OpenBPC sind im September zusätzlich die Daten für OA-Artikel aus den DEAL-Verträgen mit Wiley und Springer Nature für 2021 gemeldet worden (hier aufbereitet als Treemap).
Open-Access-Tage 2022. Die TU Berlin war mit verschiedenen eigenen Beiträgen bei den OA-Tagen 2022 in Bern vertreten: Folien zum Vortrag „Neue Standards braucht das Land – Neufassung der Qualitätsstandards für Bücher im goldenen Open Access“ https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7089278. 2. Posterpreis für Poster der DINI AG E-Pub zum DINI-Zertifikat 2022: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6947443. Dokumentation des Workshops zu Zweitveröffentlichungen: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7142237.
Repositorium. Die Policy von DepositOnce, dem institutionellen Repositorium der TU Berlin für Forschungsdaten und Publikationen, wurde redaktionell überarbeitet. DepositOnce wurde im September 2022 erfolgreich (als eines der ersten Repositorien in Deutschland) auf die Version 7 der Open-Source-Software DSpace migriert.
Forschungsdatenmanagement (FDM). Die Aufzeichnung der Coffee Lecture „L♥ve your data – 5 clevere Ideen für dein persönliches Datenmanagement“ ist online abrufbar.
Dissertationen. Die Aufzeichnung der Coffee Lecture „Fertig geschrieben, verteidigt und dann? – Wie Sie Ihre Dissertation veröffentlichen“ ist online abrufbar. Im Rahmen der oa.network-Reihe OA-Talks gab Marléne Friedrich im April 2022 einen Überblick, was bei der Open-Access-Veröffentlichung von kumulativen Dissertationen zu beachten ist. Die Folien sind unter freier Lizenz online verfügbar. Mirror Journals. Eine Arbeitsgruppe mit Kolleginnen der Charité Berlin, des FZ Jülich, der TU Braunschweig und der TU Berlin hat sich eingängig mit dem Thema „Mirror Journals“ beschäftigt: Es wurden Prüfkriterien entwickelt und eine Titelliste erstellt; ein Blogbeitrag (in Deutsch und Englisch) informiert über die Hintergründe.
COAR Community Framework for Good Practices in Repositories. Yannick Paulsen hat im Rahmen eines Praktikums an der Universitätsbibliothek das „COAR Community Framework for Good Practices in Repositories“ ins Deutsche übersetzt und einen Beitrag im Blog der DINI AGs FIS & EPUB veröffentlicht. 

Technische Universität Berlin (TU Berlin) und Universität der Künste (UdK)

Preis für Bibliotheken. Die Bibliotheken der UdK Berlin und der TU Berlin wurden als „Bib des Jahres 2022“ ausgezeichnet – u.a. für Aktivitäten in den Bereichen Open Access, Forschungsdatenmanagement und den Einsatz für Openness. Mehr Informationen in der Pressemitteilung.

Weitere Nachrichten

 Vernetzungsstellen. Auf der Webseite des vom BMBF-geförderten Projektes open-access.network findet sich eine Auflistung der Vernetzungsstellen zu Open Access in Deutschland: https://open-access.network/vernetzen/vernetzungsstellen 

Open4DE: Stand und Perspektiven von Open Access in Deutschland

Anmeldung zum Online Workshop

Wann: Donnerstag, 8. Dezember 2022, 9h30 – 12h30

Im Projekt Open4DE haben wir in Workshops, Interviews und Policy-Analysen den Stand von Open Access in Deutschland ermittelt und Vorschläge für den Weg zu einem bundesweiten Open-Access-Strategieprozess erarbeitet. Zum Projektabschluss möchten wir unsere Forschungsergebnisse zur Diskussion stellen:

  • Wie kann die weitere Open-Access-Transformation gestaltet werden?
  • Welche Maßnahmen könnten die Open-Access-Transformation beschleunigen?
  • Wie können zentrale Stakeholder in einem gemeinsamen Strategieprozess zusammenarbeiten?

Diese und weitere Fragen wollen wir in unserem abschließenden Workshop gemeinsam diskutieren. Unser Projekt wird mit einem Landscape-Report abschließen, der sowohl Lücken aufzeigen als auch Anreize und Potentiale darstellen soll. Darin enthalten ist ein Anforderungskatalog für einen nationalen Open-Access-Strategieprozess, in dem verschiedene Szenarien sowie Vorschläge für eine Roadmap berücksichtigt werden.

In diesem Strategieworkshop möchten wir eine übergreifende Vision sowie konkrete mittel- und langfristige Ziele, Prioritäten und Vorschläge für die nächsten Schritte entwickeln. Auf diesem Wege soll die Entwicklung und Implementierung einer Open-Access-Strategie vorangetrieben werden. Besondere Berücksichtigung findet dabei der breitere Kontextes der Transformation der Wissenschaftskommunikation und die Bedeutung von Open Science für die deutsche Wissenschaftslandschaft.

Weitere Infos und Berichte aus unserem Projekt finden Sie in der Kategorie Open4DE auf dem Open-Access-Blog Berlin.

Open4DE ist ein Verbundprojekt von

Wissenschaft – Politik – Akteur*innen: Die Open-Access-Transformation nachhaltig gestalten

Registrierung

26. Oktober 2022, 14h00

Die Wissenschaftspolitik spielt eine wichtige Rolle für das erfolgreiche Gelingen einer Open-Access-Transformation. Neben der Verabschiedung von Open-Access-Strategien auf Landesebene ist die Einrichtung von landesspezifischen Open-Access-Initiativen ein vielversprechender Ansatz. Diese Initiativen unterstützen die jeweilige Wissenschaftslandschaft und insbesondere die Hochschulen der Länder mit Expertise, Impulsen und Infrastrukturen. Die Vernetzungsstellen können als Intermediär zielorientiert auf agile Entwicklungen reagieren und eine Open-Access-Praxis ermöglichen, die alle Interessen ausgewogen berücksichtigt. 

Die Bundesländer Berlin, Brandenburg und Nordrhein-Westfalen verfolgen gerade diesen Weg. In der Veranstaltung werden die Motivation, die Konzepte und die Aktivitäten der jeweiligen Initiativen präsentiert. Anschließend diskutieren wir Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschiede, Best-Practices und Desiderate vor dem Hintergrund der Erfahrungen der Initiativen und der Teilnehmenden.

Dies ist eine gemeinsame Veranstaltung der Landesinitiative openaccess.nrw, dem Open-Access-Büro Berlin (OABB) und der Vernetzungs- und Kompetenzstelle Open Access Brandenburg (VuK) im Rahmen der Internationalen Open Access Woche 2022. Den Zugangslink erhalten Sie nach einer Registrierung über Webex.

Call for Posters und Save the Date – Internationale Open Access Woche 2022 – Get Together und Posterausstellung

Anmeldung zur Veranstaltung

Jacob-und-Wilhelm-Grimm-Zentrum
Geschwister-Scholl-Straße 1/3
10117 Berlin

Am 25.10.2022, ab 16 Uhr

Einsendeschluss für Poster am 11.10.2022

Die International Open Access Week findet jährlich im Oktober statt und bietet global allen Open-Access-Akteur*innen die Gelegenheit, die Idee des offenen Zugangs zu wissenschaftlichem Wissen und kulturellem Erbe zu teilen und voranzubringen. In diesem Jahr lädt das Open-Access-Büro zusammen mit den Forschungs- und Kompetenzzentrum Digitalisierung Berlin (digiS) alle Einrichtungen aus Berlin ein, ihre Open-Access-Projekte im Rahmen einer Posterausstellung zu präsentieren. Die Poster werden zur Open Access Week am 25.10.2022 im Auditorium des Jacob-und-Wilhelm-Grimm-Zentrum ausgestellt. Ab 16 Uhr laden wir herzlich alle Open-Access-Akteur*innen der Region ein, die Möglichkeit zum Kennenlernen und Austausch bei einem Kaltgetränk und kleinem Buffet zu nutzen.

Im Sinne der Open-Access-Strategie Berlin soll die Posterausstellung drei Bereiche adressieren: Offener Zugang zu wissenschaftlichen Publikationen, offener Zugang zu Forschungsdaten und offener Zugang zum kulturellen Erbe / Kulturdaten. Zudem laden wir Projekte ein, die sich mit Open-Research-Praktiken beschäftigen und insbesondere das diesjährige Motto „Open for Climate Justice“ adressieren.

Wer kann Poster einreichen?

  • Wissenschaftler*innen
  • Mitarbeitende an wissenschaftlichen Einrichtungen oder Infrastruktureinrichtungen
  • Mitarbeitende an Kultureinrichtungen

Welche Inhalte können präsentiert werden?

  • Aktuelle Forschungsprojekte mit Open-Reasearch-Bezug
  • Langfristige oder aktuelle Open-Access-Infrastrukturangebote
  • Open-Access-Zeitschriften und größere Open-Access-Publikationsprojekte
  • Projekte und Services zum offenen Zugang zu Forschungsdaten / Open Research Data
  • Projekte und Services zum offenen Zugang zum kulturellen Erbe / Kulturdaten

Welche Formalia sollten beachtet werden?

  • Legen Sie die Poster in der Größe DIN A0 an und reichen Sie es als PDF-Datei ein.
  • Es können mehrere zusammengehörige Projekte auf einem Poster präsentiert werden.
  • Das Poster wird unter der Lizenz CC-BY 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) veröffentlicht. Bitte fügen Sie diese Lizenzinformation gut sichtbar in das Poster ein und stellen Sie vor der Einreichung sicher, dass Sie über die entsprechenden Rechte an allen Texten und Abbildungen verfügen.
  • Geben Sie die Autor*innen bzw. Ansprechpartner*innen und eine Kontaktmöglichkeit oder Webseite auf dem Poster an.
  • Reichen Sie bitte zusammen mit dem Poster eine Projektbeschreibung von max. 2000 Zeichen (inkl. Leerzeichen) als offene Text-Datei ein.

Einsendeschluss für Poster am 11.10.2022 per E-Mail an oabb@open-access-berlin.de mit dem Betreff „OA-Week 2022 Poster (Titel Ihres Posters)“

International Open Access Week 2022 „Open for Climate Justice” – Veranstaltungen in Berlin und Brandenburg

#OpenForClimateJustice

#OAWeek22

Die internationale Open Access Week findet vom 24.-30. Oktober 2022 unter dem Motto „Open for Climate Justice“ statt.  Das Open-Access-Büro Berlin sammelt wieder Aktionen der Berliner Einrichtungen.

Interviewreihe: Auch in diesem Jahr setzt die Technische Universität die Interviewreihe „Wie halten Sie es mit Open Access?“ auf dem eigenen Blog fort. Weitere Informationen finden Sie hier.

Videoreihe: Quo vadis Offene Wissenschaft in Berlin und Brandenburg: Let’s talk! Mit einer Reihe von Videobeiträgen sollen verschiedene Aspekte der Offenen Wissenschaft erörtert und die Diversität der Perspektiven sichtbar werden. Täglich wird einer dieser Beiträge veröffentlicht und zur Diskussion gestellt. Die Reihe wird organisiert von der Vernetzungs- und Kompetenzstelle Open Access Brandenburg und der Technischen Hochschule Wildau und setzt die Veranstaltungsreihe „Quo vadis Offene Wissenschaft“ aus dem Jahr 2021/2022 fort. 

Montag, 24.10.2022

Puzzle (und Quiz) an der TU Berlin: Die Technische Universität lädt eine zu einem kleinen Quiz and der Puzzlewand in der Zentralbibliothek. Weitere Informationen finden Sie hier.

Werkstattgespräch Quo Vadis Offene Wissenschaft? Let’s Talk!
Open Access in Brandenburg und die Wirkungen der OA-Strategie des Landes – mit Ben Kaden und Prof. Dr. jur. Ellen Euler, LL.M.
Link: https://open-access-brandenburg.de/lets-talk/

13.00-13.30 ONLINE | (What if…?) Open Science by Default!: In this talk representatives of Berlin Exchange Medicine (BEM), a student-run journal, will share their vision for Open Science at the heart of academic education.

15.00-15.30 ONLINE | „Ich will doch nur das PDF!“ – Tools für’s Auffinden von Literatur: In diesem Kurztutorial zeigt Berlin Universities Publishing Wege und Kniffe, um schnell und einfach an Volltexte von wissenschaftlicher Literatur zu gelangen. (Registrierung erforderlich)

Dienstag, 25.10.2022

Werkstattgespräch Quo Vadis Offene Wissenschaft? Let’s Talk!
Post-LMS-Discovery-Systeme – Frank Seeliger (TH Wildau)  im Interview mit Linda Thomas (Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg, Universitätsbibliothek), Dr. Axel Kaschte(OCLC), Dr. Klaus Ceynowa (Bayerische Staatsbibliothek München) und Björn Muschall (AG Anwendungsmanagement in der Universitätsbibliothek Leipzig)
Link: https://open-access-brandenburg.de/lets-talk/

13.00-13.45 ONLINE | BerlinUP stellt sich vor: In diesem Webinar stellt der neu gegründete Verlag seine 3 Sparten (BerlinUP Books, BerlinUP Journals, BerlinUP Beratung) und deren Leistungen vor.

Ab 16.00 | Get Together und Posterausstellung im Jacob-und-Wilhelm-Grimm-Zentrum: Zusammen mit dem Forschungs- und Kompetenzzentrum Digitalisierung Berlin (digiS) organisiert das Open-Access-Büro Berlin eine Posterausstellung und Get Together zum Austausch der Berliner Open Access / Open Research Community.

Mittwoch, 26.10.2022

Werkstattgespräch Quo Vadis Offene Wissenschaft? Let’s Talk!
Desinformation und Open Access – mit Juliane Stiller und Violeta Trkulja (beide Grenzenlos Digital e.V.), moderiert von Julia Boltze (Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund Berlin-Brandenburg – KOBV)
Link: https://open-access-brandenburg.de/lets-talk/

13.00-13.45 ONLINE | Von Zugang zu Überwachung – neue Geschäftsmodelle der alten Verlage: In dieser durch Berlin Universities Publishing organisierten Veranstaltung sprechen Björn Brembs und Konrad Förstner über die Überwachung der Wissenschaftler*innen und die Sammlung von Nutzerdaten durch große Wissenschaftsverlage. Daran anschließend wird gemeinsam diskutiert.

14.00-15.00 ONLINE | Wissenschaft – Politik – Akteur*innen: Die Open-Access-Transformation nachhaltig gestalten: Dies ist eine gemeinsame Veranstaltung der Landesinitiative openaccess.nrw, dem Open-Access-Büro Berlin (OABB) und der Vernetzungs- und Kompetenzstelle Open Access Brandenburg (VuK). Den Zugangslink erhalten Sie nach einer Registrierung über Webex.

15.00-15.45 ONLINE | Coffee Lecture: Open Access Basiswissen: In einer gemeinsamen Coffee Lecture informieren die Evangelische Hochschule und die Alice Salomon Hochschule Berlin über die Grundlagen von Open Access. Die Auswahl der Inhalte orientiert sich dabei konsequent an den konkreten Bedürfnissen und Fragen der Forschenden. Weitere Informationen finden Sie auf den Websites von EHB und ASH.

19.00 am HIIG & LIVESTREAM | Digitaler Salon: Wissen MACHT Klima: Das Alexander von Humboldt Institut für Internet und Gesellschaft (HIIG) veranstaltet eine Podiumsdiskussion zur Frage, wie gerecht der weltweite Zugang zu Wissen gerade im Fall von Klimagerechtigkeit wirklich ist. Der Digitale Salon findet jeden letzten Mittwoch im Monat unter einer anderen Fragestellung statt. Aufzeichnungen vergangener Digitaler Salons und mehr Informationen finden Sie hier.

Donnerstag, 27.10.2022

Werkstattgespräch Quo Vadis Offene Wissenschaft? Let’s Talk!
Open Access im Gefüge der wissenschaftlichen Karriere – Initiiert vom Berliner Arbeitskreis Information (BAK) mit dem ERC Starting Grant-Gewinner und Associate Member am Nuffield College (University of Oxford) Félix Krawatzek
Link: https://open-access-brandenburg.de/lets-talk/

13.00-13.30 ONLINE | Kann ich mir Open Access leisten? Finanzierungs- und Fördermöglichkeiten: In diesem von Berlin Universities Publishing veranstalteten Vortrag von Sandra Golda (HU Berlin) erhalten Sie einen Überblick über die Finanzierungs- und Fördermöglichkeiten. Registrierung erforderlich.

15.00-16.00 ONLINE | Open Science und Klimagerechtigkeit: In diesem von Berlin Universities Publishing veranstalteten Vortrag spricht Claudia Frick, Meteorologin und Bibliothekarin, zum Thema Wissenschaftskommunikation rund um den Klimawandel. Registrierung erforderlich.

Freitag, 28.10.2022

Werkstattgespräch Quo Vadis Offene Wissenschaft? Let’s Talk!
Open Access und Datentracking – Im fünften Werkstattgespräch spricht Thomas Arndt (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Spezialbibliotheken) mit Prof. Dr. Björn Brembs (Universität Regensburg), Dr. Arne Upmeier (Karlsruher Institut für Technologie – KIT) und Dr. Robert Altschaffel (Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg)
Link: https://open-access-brandenburg.de/lets-talk/

13.00-14.00 ONLINE | Design + Diversity – Critical Approaches through Open Tech: This talk will give examples of experimental transdisciplinary practices from Europe and Sub-Saharan Africa in order to discuss the potential of bending the boundaries of research, opening up the parameters of who produces knowledge and on whose terms. Speakers are Michelle Christensen and Florian Conradi who share the visiting professorship for Open Science (Critical Culture / Critical Design) at TU Berlin and the Einstein Center Digital Future, as well as co-heading the research group ‘Design, Diversity and New Commons’ at the Berlin University of the Arts / Weizenbaum Institute.

14.00-15.00 ONLINE | Open up your Past – Publikationen nachträglich frei zugänglich machen: In diesem Workshop von Berlin Universities Publishing erfahren Sie von Sandra Golda und Marc Lange (beide HU Berlin), wie Sie Open Access auch für bereits veröffentlichte Closed-Access-Publikationen erreichen können. Registrierung erforderlich.

Open Access in Deutschland. Stakeholder Workshop mit Bund und Ländern

Im Mittelpunkt des dritten Stakeholder-Workshops des Projektes Open4DE standen die Herausforderungen und Chancen der Umsetzung von Open Access aus Perspektive der Landesregierungen und des Bundes.

Am 26. Juni 2022 fand in den Räumen des Bundesministeriums für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF) in Berlin ein Workshop statt, in dem Vertreter*innen der 16 Bundesländer eingeladen waren, sich mit Vertreter*innen des BMBF über gemeinsame Standpunkte zu Open Access auszutauschen. Treffen dieser Art sind nicht neu; bereits seit 2019 findet ein Austausch in dieser Runde statt. Dieses Jahr konnte das Projekt Open4DE gemeinsam mit dem BMBF diesen Workshop in Präsenz organisieren und die Diskussion zum Status Quo in Deutschland mit ersten Projektergebnissen anreichern.

In zwei Vorträgen stellten Projektmitarbeiter*innen Forschungsergebnisse vor. Der Fokus lag dabei auf der Frage, was Deutschland in Hinblick auf eine nationale Open-Access-Strategie von anderen Ländern lernen kann und darauf, welcher Handlungsbedarf sich konkret auf Landes- und Bundesebene erkennen lässt. Am Nachmittag wurden gezielt gemeinsame Standpunkte diskutiert. Dazu wurden in zwei weiteren Impulsvorträgen die “Empfehlungen zur Transformation des wissenschaftlichen Publizierens zu Open Access” vom Wissenschaftsrat und das DFG Positionspapier “Wissenschaftliches Publizieren als Grundlage und Gestaltungsfeld der Wissenschaftsbewertung” vorgestellt.

Was kann Deutschland von anderen Ländern lernen?

Die Forschungsergebnisse basieren auf Interviews, die von Januar bis Mai 2022 zu Policy-Prozessen in acht verschiedenen Ländern mit Expert*innen durchgeführt wurden. Dabei wurden Fragen zum gesamten Policy-Prozess gestellt, angefangen von den Rahmenbedingungen über die institutionelle Verankerung, Kooperationen und Konflikte zwischen den Akteursgruppen bis hin zur Strategieentwicklung selbst, die mit Fragen zu Beteiligungsprozessen und der Funktionsweise von Arbeitsgruppen zur Entwicklung von Open Access Policies näher beleuchtet wurde. Bei der Auswahl der Länder (Finnland, Schweden, Litauen, Irland, Niederlande, Großbritannien, Frankreich, Österreich) wurde auf das Vorhandensein strategischer Abläufe geachtet, entweder in Form von nationalen Strategien oder in Form bestehender Diskussionen über eine nationale Strategie. Aus den Interviews ließen sich übergeordnete Themen extrahieren: Vorteile nationaler Strategien, Erkenntnisse zur Steuerung von Strategieprozessen und schließlich Herausforderungen und Zukunftsthemen.

Die Vorteile einer nationalen Strategie sind vielseitig und zeigen sich je nach Kontext auf unterschiedliche Weise. Für das föderal aufgestellte Deutschland stellt sich deshalb zurecht die Frage, welche Rolle eine nationale Strategie hier spielen kann. Am Beispiel anderer Länder sehen wir allerdings, dass unabhängig von den Rahmenbedingungen das Agenda-Setting bereits weitreichende Impulse gibt, die nicht nur auf Ebene der Institutionen, sondern auch bei Wissenschaftler*innen Aufmerksamkeit erregen. Zudem können mit einer nationalen Strategie Aktivitäten, die zahlreich, aber auf unterschiedlichen Ebenen angesiedelt sind, synchronisiert werden. Neben der Aufwertung des Themas wird auch die internationale Sichtbarkeit und Zusammenarbeit durch eine nationale Strategie gestärkt. Wichtig ist hierbei, dass die Wirksamkeit einer solchen Strategie immer nur im Zusammenwirken mit entsprechenden Maßnahmen Legitimation erfährt. In Bezug auf die nationale Strategieentwicklung in Frankreich erwähnte Pierre Mounier im Interview:

„Viele Jahre lang war Open Access eine Sache des persönlichen Engagements von Einzelpersonen innerhalb von Institutionen. Persönliches Engagement auf der Grundlage politischer Werte. Wenn man das tut, funktioniert es lokal, aber irgendwann erreicht man eine gläserne Decke. Man bekommt keine allgemeine Bewegung, weil es nur eine Sache von Einzelpersonen ist. Das hat sich in Frankreich wirklich geändert.“

Pierre Mounier, Deputy Director of OpenEdition; OPERAS; Member of the Open Science Committee at the French Ministry of Research, Frankreich

In Frankreich, das bereits den zweiten nationalen Open Science Plan veröffentlicht hat, ist die Steuerung dieser Prozesse am Ministerium für Wissenschaft und Forschung angegliedert. Dies ist jedoch nicht in allen Ländern der Fall. Dort, wo es nationale Infrastrukturen gibt, werden diese auch genutzt: In Irland wurde beispielsweise ein National Open Research Forum (NORF) gegründet, dessen Koordinator am Digital Repository of Irland angesiedelt ist und in Schweden sitzt das Lenkungsgremium an der Nationalbibliothek. Finnland stellt wiederum einen interessanten Sonderfall dar, denn dort wurde die nationale Steuerung von Open Science and Research (OScAR) vom Ministerium an die Federation of Finnish Learned Societies übertragen, was die Legitimität der Maßnahmen und Empfehlungen zunehmend erhöht hat.

Es lässt sich zusammenfassen, dass insbesondere die Herausforderung, möglichst Viele am Steuerungsprozess zu beteiligen, vielfältige Lösungsansätze benötigt. Ob durch offene Foren und Arbeitsgruppen, offene Phasen der Konsultation, über Anreizsysteme oder eine Konsultation über die Fachvertretungen: sowohl die große Heterogenität der Fächer und Fachkulturen als auch die Stärken und Schwächen unterschiedlicher Akteur*innen beim Thema Open Access bergen das Risiko in sich, dass ein nationaler Prozess ins Stocken gerät oder parallel laufende Entwicklungen auseinanderdriften. Deshalb gilt es aus einem Kreislauf herauszukommen, in dem die Verantwortung für den notwendigen Kulturwandel zugunsten der Open-Access-Transformation immer wieder bei den Wissenschaftler*innen gesucht wird, ohne einen nationalen Prozess der Teilhabe zu entwickeln, der eine politische Steuerung eben dieses Kulturwandels ermöglicht. Dabei sind es insbesondere Themen wie die Erweiterung von Open Access zu Open Science, offene Forschungsdaten und die Reform der Forschungsbewertung, die nur durch einen breit angelegten Prozess der Konsultation zielführend bearbeitet werden können.

Wo besteht Handlungsbedarf innerhalb der Open-Access-Landschaft in Deutschland?

Nationale Strategien sind also effektiv, erleichtern das Agenda-Setting und den internationalen Vergleich, bilden einen starken Bezugspunkt und ein Mandat für Maßnahmen auf Einrichtungsebene und erleichtern die internationale Zusammenarbeit. Was können Interessenvertretungen wie Bund und Länder zum Prozess der Entwicklung einer nationalen Strategie beitragen und was haben sie bereits beigetragen? Auch diese Frage wurde im Projekt Open4DE untersucht. Die Ergebnisse basieren auf einer Auswertung von Strategien und Policies von Einrichtungen, Wissenschaftsorganisationen, Landesregierungen und Fachgesellschaften sowie auf der Auswertung des Open Access Atlas Deutschland (2022), der im Projekt open-access.network am Open-Access-Büro Berlin entstanden ist. Dabei wurde für diesen Workshop der Fokus auf die Landesregierung als Akteurin in der Open-Access-Transformation gelegt und auf die Verantwortung, die dieser in den Dokumenten zugeschrieben wird.

Der Open Access Atlas Deustchland (2022) verzeichnet die Open-Access-Aktivitäten auf Bundes- und Länderebene. Es lässt sich feststellen, dass Open Access je nach Bundesland einen unterschiedlichen Entwicklungsstand erreicht hat. Bund und einige Länder haben Strategien verabschiedet oder planen diese, andere unterstützen Open Access durch Instrumente der Hochschulsteuerung wie in Wissenschafts- bzw. Hochschulentwicklungsplänen oder sie benennen Open Access als Handlungsfeld innerhalb von Digitalstrategien. Gezielte Maßnahmen reichen dabei von eigenen Landeseinrichtungen zur Vernetzung und Kommunikation über die Finanzierung von Publikationsfonds bis hin zu spezifischen Förderlinien. Hierbei zeigt sich nicht nur eine große Vielfalt, sondern es stellt sich auch die Frage, wie der “langfristige[…] Betrieb von Diensten über Bundesländergrenzen hinweg” gestaltet werden kann (DFG. 2018. Förderung von Informationsinfrastrukturen für die Wissenschaft). Diskutiert wurde die Frage auch im Workshop, denn zentrale Lösungen für bestimmte Herausforderungen zu finden, kann für eine breit aufgestellte und divers ausgerichtete Open-Access-Transformation von Vorteil sein.

Konkrete Aufgabe der Länder ist es, die Rahmenbedingungen für eine Open-Access-Transformation mitzugestalten. Zu diesen Rahmenbedingungen können unterschiedliche Maßnahmen gezählt werden. Im Projekt Open4DE konnten neben Infrastruktur, rechtlichen Rahmenbedingungen und Forschungsförderung sechs weitere Felder identifiziert werden.

  • Dazu gehört einmal die Verantwortung der Ministerien, selbst eine Open-Access-Praxis vorzuleben, denn häufig werden von Ministerien herausgegebene Dokumente ohne persistente Identifikatoren wie DOIs oder stabile URLs publiziert. Das Handlungsfeld offener Verwaltungsdaten (open (government) data) ist viel diskutiert, dabei sollte das Open-Access-Publizieren von Eigenpublikationen ebenso auf die Agenda gesetzt werden, sofern rechtliche Rahmenbedingungen dies zulassen.
  • Zum zweiten liegt die Verantwortung, den Mehrwert von Open Access für die Gesellschaft zu kommunizieren, auch im Bereich der Landeseinrichtungen. Häufig werden die Vorteile, die durch Open Access erzielt werden, auf Wettbewerbsfähigkeit und Innovation beschränkt, insbesondere wenn ein Mehrwert im Austausch mit der Wirtschaft gesucht wird. Dabei gilt es den Blick für Gerechtigkeitsfragen zu weiten und diese auch im globalen Zusammenhang zu verorten. Gerechtigkeitsfragen können im Bedeutungsfeld Open Access bspw. über einen demokratisierten Informationszugriff adressiert werden, der einen Mehrwert für die Gesamtgesellschaft generiert.
  • Drittens ist die Gestaltung der Teilhabe an wissenschaftspolitischen Prozessen eine der Aufgaben, an der Landeseinrichtungen maßgeblich mitwirken können. Die Zugänglichkeit von Forschung wird häufig auf Institutionen und deren Angehörige beschränkt, sollte aber für alle möglich sein, d.h. für Autor*innen und alle lesenden Personen. Zudem ist die Repräsentation von Wissenschaftler*innen ein Problem im Prozess der Konsolidierung von übergeordneten Strategien, d.h. es wird häufig für die wissenschaftliche Community gesprochen, aber diese ist kaum in Strategieprozessen repräsentiert.
  • Das Umsetzen von Empfehlungen ist dabei eine der Hauptaufgaben, denen Landeseinrichtungen nachkommen, bspw. indem Strategien und Policies auf Länderebene veröffentlicht werden. Diese Dokumente sind Ergebnisse eines zeitgebundenen Diskurses und bedürfen damit einer Aktualisierung. Policy-Prozesse sollten zu Ergebnissen führen, die dauerhafte Möglichkeiten der Beteiligung und Konsolidierung eröffnen.
  • Ein wichtiges Instrument, um den Erfolg von Open Access zu messen, sind die Berichtsstrukturen. Monitoring findet in einigen Ländern auf Länderebene statt, auf nationaler Ebene durch den Open Access Monitor (OAM) und an einzelnen Einrichtungen. Ziel ist es, das Publikationsaufkommen vollständig zu erheben. Das Problem ist hier allerdings häufig eine Verengung auf wissenschaftliche Artikel in Open-Access-Zeitschriften, die wiederum zu einer Verzerrung des Feldes führt. Eine Diversifizierung der Berichtsstrukturen auf verschiedene Publikationsformate und -praktiken bedarf weiterer Entwicklung und Implementierung.
  • Zuletzt liegt auch der Kulturwandel zugunsten von Open Access teilweise im Aufgabenfeld der Landeseinrichtungen, denn die Reputationsökonomie ist wichtiger Bestandteil dieses Kulturwandels und eine Veränderung bedarf einer systemischen Reform. Wie zuletzt durch das DFG-Positionspapier zu wissenschaftlichem Publizieren erläutert, geht es dabei um eine Veränderung der Qualitätssicherung, die nicht bloß auf einer Quantifizierung beruhen kann. Um qualitative Indikatoren für die Reputationsmessung zu stärken, kann ein Kriterienkatalog für die Bewertung von Forschungsarbeiten und Forscher*innen entwickelt werden, der vielfältig, objektivierbar und offen zugänglich ist und explizit Aspekte offener Wissenschaft einbezieht. Dieser muss zwar innerhalb der Wissenschaft entwickelt werden, eine Unterstützung dieses Kulturwandels muss jedoch auch durch Policy-Prozesse auf Landesebene geschehen. Hierzu gibt es bereits reichlich Empfehlungen, die auf eine Umsetzung warten, zuletzt die “Conclusions on research assessment and implementation of open science” der Europäischen Kommission (2022), das „Agreement on Reforming Research Assessment“ (2022) von Science Europe oder der zuvor publizierte “Paris Call on Research Assessment” (2022).

Ausblick: Eine nationale Open-Access-Strategie für Deutschland

Eine Diskussion über diese Themenfelder wurde bereits in den vorherigen Austauschrunden zwischen Bund und Ländern zu Open Access geführt. Dieser Workshop konnte dazu beitragen, die Rollen und Handlungsfelder der Stakeholder in diesem Prozess zu reflektieren und die Open-Access-Landschaft in Deutschland in ein internationales Verhältnis zu setzen. Das Projekt Open4DE plant für Dezember 2022 einen Multi-Stakeholder-Workshop, in dessen Rahmen die Projektergebnisse in Form von Empfehlungen und einer Roadmap für eine nationale Strategie vorgeschlagen und diskutiert werden. Dabei geht es in erster Linie um eine gemeinsame Perspektive für den weiteren Strategieprozess, an dem auch die Vertreter*innen der Landeseinrichtungen und des Bundes beteiligt sein werden.

Fachcommunities könnten Vorreiter sein

Im Mittelpunkt des zweiten Stakeholder-Workshops des Projektes Open4DE standen die Herausforderungen und Chancen der Umsetzung von Open Access aus Perspektive der Fachgesellschaften

Das Projekt Open4DE, Stand und Perspektiven für eine Open-Access-Strategie für Deutschland erhebt auf der Grundlage einer qualitativen Auswertung von Policy-Dokumenten den Umsetzungsstand von Open Access in Deutschland. Im zweiten Schritt entwickelt das Projekt im Dialog mit den wichtigsten Stakeholdern im Feld Empfehlungen für eine bundesweite Open Access-Strategie. Bereits im Januar fand in diesem Rahmen ein Workshop mit dem scholar.led-network Netzwerk statt. Am 24. Mai 2022 waren Vertreter*innen der Fachgesellschaften zu einer gemeinsamen Diskussion eingeladen.

Rund zwanzig Fachgesellschaftsvertreter*innen aus geistes-, sozial-, und naturwissenschaftlichen Organisationen waren der Einladung von Open4DE gefolgt, darunter viele, die insbesondere mit den organisationseigenen Publikationen befasst sind, aber auch Mitarbeiter*innen der Geschäftsstellen und Vorstandsmitglieder. Im ersten Teil des Workshops stellte das Projekt Open4DE seine Ergebnisse aus der Untersuchung des Umsetzungs- und Diskussionsstandes von Open Access und Open Science in den Fachgesellschaften vor.

Umsetzungsstand von Open Access in den Fachgesellschaften

Open Access setzt sich, verbunden mit unterschiedlichen fachlichen Publikationskulturen, in wissenschaftlichen Disziplinen ungleich durch (vgl. z.B. Severin et al. 2022). Während die Physik bereits in den frühen 1990er Jahren eigene Publikationsinfrastrukturen für die fachinterne Zirkulation von Preprints aufbaute (arXiv), spielt in anderen wissenschaftlichen Disziplinen bis heute die Monographie eine zentrale Rolle.

Abb.1. Am Anfang des Workshops wurden die teilnehmenden Vertreter:innen der Fachgesellschaften gefragt, mit welchen Aspekten von Open Acces Sie in ihrer täglichen Praxis zu tun haben. Die Antworten deuten bereits Schwerpunkte in eigener Publikationstätigkeit an

Förderlich für die Aufgeschlossenheit gegenüber Open Access ist ein hoher Nutzen des offenen Zugangs zu digitalisierten Daten (wie z.B. in der Archäologie). Auch die transnationale Vernetzung von Fachdisziplinen mit ärmeren Ländern fördert die Akzeptanz von Open Access. Teilweise sind es eher die kleinen Fächer, die Vorreiter von Open Access und Open Science sind, da sie besonders von einer höheren Sichtbarkeit und einer freien Dissemination ihrer Daten profitieren (vgl. Arbeitsstelle kleiner Fächer 2020).

Policy-Papiere mit konkreten Handlungsanleitungen zur Umsetzung von Open Access haben Fachgesellschaften nicht verabschiedet. Einige Fachgesellschaften bringen sich aber mit Stellungnahmen in die Diskussion um Open Access und Open Science ein. Insbesondere Plan S löste Debatten aus (vgl. DMV et al. 2019). Dabei steht die Sorge um die Zukunft des wissenschaftlichen Publikationswesens an erster Stelle.

Weitere Diskursanlässe sind die Transformation fachgesellschaftseigener Publikationen in Open Access (vgl. DGSKA 2021) sowie der Umgang mit (offenen) Forschungsdaten (vgl. DGfE 2017; DGfE/GEBF/GFD 2020; DGV 2018; Schönbrodt/Gollwitzer/Abele-Brehm 2017; Abele-Brehm et al. 2017; Gollwitzer et al. 2018, 2021). Letzteres zeigt auch, wie fachwissenschaftliche Selbstverständigungsprozesse von außen evoziert werden, hier durch die Aufforderung der DFG, disziplinäre Richtlinien im Forschungsdatenmanagement zu formulieren (vgl. DFG 2015).

Trotz dieser zahlreichen Einzelinitiativen bleibt festzustellen, dass sich die Fachgesellschaften insgesamt – von einigen bedeutsamen Ausnahmen abgesehen – eher wenig sicht- und hörbar in die Diskussion und Aushandlung von Open Access in Deutschland eingebracht haben. Unter den rund 750 Unterzeichner*innen der Berliner Erklärung von 2003 sind zahlreiche Universitäten und Forschungseinrichtungen aber nur vier Fachgesellschaften (Stand: 28. Juni 2022). Die Gelegenheit, die Open-Access-Transformation als Anlass zu nutzen, um wissenschaftliche Standards vor dem Hintergrund eines grundlegenden Wandels von Wissenschaft durch die Digitalisierung innerhalb der eigenen Fachcommunity zu diskutieren und damit diese Transformation aktiv mitzugestalten (vgl. z.B. Ganz 2020), wird bislang nur in wenigen Fachgesellschaften aktiv ergriffen. Das überrascht, da Fachgesellschaften Orte der Selbstorganisation und der Selbstverständigung fachlicher Communities sind (vgl. Wissenschaftsrat 1992). Finden in den Fachcommunities keine Diskussionen über Open Access und Open Science statt oder sind diese lediglich nicht sichtbar, weil sie nicht in öffentlichen Stellungnahmen münden? In jedem Fall bleibt festzustellen, dass die Entwicklung des Themas Open Access in den Fachgesellschaften noch viel Potential besitzt. „Fachcommunities könnten eine Vorreiterrolle einnehmen“, sagte ein Teilnehmende  in Hinblick auf die gegenwärtige Situation und benannte damit sowohl die Chancen als auch die Herausforderungen der wissenschaftsnahen Entwicklung des Themas Open Access.

Im Anschluss an diese Gegenwartsdiagnose wurden in unserem Workshop folgende Handlungsfelder identifiziert: 

  1. Die Ausgestaltung des wissenschaftlichen Publikationswesens in der Open-Access-Transformation (Geschäftsmodelle, Finanzierung, Publikationsformate).
  2. Qualitätssicherung, wissenschaftliche Anerkennungsverfahren und Reputationssysteme
  3. Die Definition der Rolle fachwissenschaftlicher Communities in der Open-Access-Transformation als Vertreter*innen und Sprachrohr ihrer Community in Governance-Prozessen.

Aus diesen Handlungsfeldern wurden im Anschluss in Arbeitsgruppen weitere Fragen, Maßnahmen und Empfehlungen abgeleitet:

Reputationssysteme

Ausgangspunkt der Diskussion in einer der beiden Arbeitsgruppen war die Beobachtung, dass Wissenschaftler*innen in erster Linie in möglichst angesehenen Zeitschriften und Verlagen publizieren wollen. Open Access sei demgegenüber eine nachgeordnete Frage, es bestünden zum Teil Vorbehalte bezüglich der Qualität. Angesichts des starken Drucks, sich durch Artikel in High Impact Journals zu etablieren, bleibe Open Access ein marginales Thema. Damit Open Access mehr Gewicht bekomme, müsse das Reputationssystem reformiert werden. Ob und wie Fachgesellschaften diesbezüglich eine Rolle übernehmen können, diskutierte die eine Arbeitsgruppe intensiv, während in der anderen Arbeitsgruppe die Meinung vorherrschte, dass Wissenschaftler*innen und ihre Organisationen selbst diese Veränderung aktiv betreiben müssten.

Die Bedeutung der Monographie

Ein wichtiger Faktor in der Open Access-Transformation ist insbesondere für die Vertreter*innen von geistes- und sozialwissenschaftlichen Fachgesellschaften die Bedeutung der Monographie. Bisher lagen die Schwerpunkte konsortialer Transformationsabkommen aber im Bereich der Zeitschriften. Mit Blick auf die Entwicklungspotentiale der Transformation des Monographienmarktes wurde unter anderem diskutiert, welche Rolle Verlage im Bereich der Qualitätssicherung haben. Bei genauerem Hinsehen, so die vorherrschende Meinung, seien es aber nicht ausschließlich die Verlage, die Qualität sichern, sondern häufig im selben Maße die Herausgeber*innen, die mit ihrem Namen für Qualität einstehen. Bemerkt wurde zusätzlich, dass Mittel für Open-Access-Bücher oft knapp seien. So stellte sich abschließend die Frage, welche fairen Lösungen für eine Finanzierung entwickelt werden können. Müssten Fachgesellschaften letztendlich selbst Repositorien und andere Infrastrukturen für die Publikation von Monographien aufbauen? Letzteres sei kaum leistbar. Als möglicher Weg, sich als Fachgesellschaft einzubringen, wurde schließlich die Publikation eigener Open-Access-Buchreihen benannt, die durch anerkannte Wissenschaftler*innen eines Fachgebietes herausgegeben werden.

Best Practices

In Bezug auf die eigene Rolle als Herausgeber*in von Zeitschriften wurden positive Erfahrungen und Handlungsmöglichkeiten geteilt: so durchläuft die Zeitschrift der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Sozial- und Kulturanthropologie (DGSKA) aktuell einen Transformationsprozess: auf APCs wird dabei verzichtet, die Finanzierung der Zeitschrift erfolgt durch die Fachgesellschaft, deren Mitglieder an der Entscheidung über die Umstellung beteiligt wurden und diese überwiegend positiv aufnehmen. Dies zeigt, dass jenseits von APCs auch andere Geschäftsmodelle möglich sind, z.B. durch konsortiale Finanzierungen, wie sie etwa in der Open Library of Humanities praktiziert oder in KOALA angestrebt werden. Über diese unterschiedlichen Möglichkeiten müsse das Bewusstsein bei den Autor*innen deutlich gestärkt werden.

Anreize zur Offenheit

Um eine Kultur der Offenheit im Publikationswesen – und dort insbesondere in der Qualitätssicherung – zu fördern, bedarf es also häufig einer verstärkten Informationsinitiative unter den Mitgliedern. Der Kenntnisstand zum Thema Offene Wissenschaft ist je nach Fachkultur unterschiedlich stark ausgeprägt. Einige Teilnehmende sprachen diesbezüglich auch von einem Generationenkonflikt unter den Mitgliedern, wobei jüngere Wissenschaftler*innen oft aufgeschlossener gegenüber Open Science und Open Access seien. Anreizsysteme können in einer solchen Situation den Kulturwandel befördern.

Ideen und Vorschläge für ein stärkeres Commitment zu offener Wissenschaft gab es viele in der Diskussion; teilweise wurde auf bereits praktizierte Maßnahmen hingewiesen. Insgesamt entstand auf diese Weise ein umfassendes Bild bereits existierender und geplanter Leistungen der Fachgesellschaften im Feld Open Access. Genannt wurde die Einrichtung von Publikationsfonds durch Fachgesellschaften, das Aussprechen von Empfehlungen für Qualitätskriterien für Zeitschriften oder die Vergabe von Preisen für Open-Access- und Open-Science-Projekte. Auch die Entwicklung von Konzepten für den Umgang mit personenbezogenen Daten sowie von Ethik-Leitlinien für Forschungsdaten könne Anreize für den Kulturwandel hin zu mehr Offenheit setzen.

Synergien schaffen

Im Allgemeinen äußerten viele den Wunsch, Konzepte und Leitlinien gemeinsam zu erarbeiten, denn finanzielle und personelle Ressourcen seien auch in den Fachgesellschaften knapp. Der Wunsch, Publikationsinfrastrukturen übergeordnet zu finanzieren, wurde mehrfach zum Ausdruck gebracht.

Gerechtigkeits- und Nachhaltigkeitsfragen

Diskutiert wurde auch, dass inzwischen zwar viele reputationsreiche Zeitschriften open access seien, die von ihnen verlangten Article Processing Charges stellten jedoch ein Problem für Autor*innen außerhalb gut ausgestatteter Forschungseinrichtungen dar. Deshalb stelle sich die Frage, wie nachhaltig die Finanzierung von APC/BPC-basiertem Open Access angesichts steigender Kosten und Publikationszahlen sein könne. Im Rahmen der DEAL-Verträge werden auch Open-Access-Publikationen in hybriden Zeitschriften finanziert. Davon profitieren z.T. auch Fachgesellschaften, die Herausgeber wissenschaftlicher Journals sind, wie die anwesende Gesellschaft deutscher Chemiker (GDCH). Doch auch dieses Modell wird kritisch diskutiert (vgl. Oberländer/Tullney 2021).

Die Rolle der Politik und der Forschungsförderer

Bezüglich der Empfehlungen an die Politik äußerten die Teilnehmenden den Wunsch, dass Forderung und Förderung (beispielsweise durch die Entwicklung vorhandener Infrastruktur) Hand in Hand gehen müssten: Teilweise sei es so, dass Fördereinrichtungen Vorgaben machten, während gleichzeitig die notwendigen (finanziellen und technischen) Rahmenbedingungen, um diese zu erfüllen, nicht bestünden. Hier sei erforderlich, dass mehr Rückkopplung stattfinde. Überhaupt sei es wünschenswert, dass Fachgesellschaften analog zur Nationalen Forschungsdaten-Infrastruktur (NFDI) auch im Bereich Open Access an einer Koordinationsstelle beteiligt seien. Hilfreich wäre es auch, wenn Verantwortliche in Politik und Fördereinrichtungen Checklisten aufstellten, anhand derer Open-Science-Standards abgeglichen und entwickelt werden könnten. Grundlegend müsse es darum gehen, Nachhaltigkeit im Wissenschaftssystem zu garantieren und transparente Kostenmodelle für das Publikationswesen zu entwickeln.

Die Rolle der Fachgesellschaften in der der Transformation

Immer wieder wurde im Laufe des Workshops das Selbstverständnis der Fachgesellschaften im Prozess der Transformation thematisiert. Brauchen (kleine) Fachgesellschaften angesichts der Open-Access-Transformation eine Strategie? Zumindest stellte sich die Frage, wie sie ihre Rolle angesichts der grundlegenden Veränderungen im Wissenschaftssystem (neu) definieren. Dies kann bedeuten, eine wissenschaftspolitische Rolle einzunehmen oder wiederzuentdecken. Zunächst ginge es aber, so einige der Anwesenden, darum, einen Überblick über die Entwicklungen im eigenen Fach zu erlangen und eine eigene Expertise zu entwickeln, um dann einen Verständigungsprozess mit den Mitgliedern anzustoßen. Zur Diskussion stand somit auch, wie Beteiligungs- und Verständigungsprozesse gestaltet werden könnten. Ferner wurde wiederholt diskutiert, ob Fachgesellschaften in der Lage seien, selbst verlegerisch tätig zu werden und welche administrativen und technischen Fragen sich daraus ergeben würden?

Den Abschluss des Workshops bildete der Ausblick auf den weiteren Projektverlauf. Dabei wurden die Teilnehmer*innen eingeladen, sich an einem im Herbst geplanten Strategieworkshop anlässlich des Projektabschlusses weiter an der Diskussion zu beteiligen. Dieser Aufforderung nachkommen zu wollen, erklärten sich in einer abschließenden Umfrage alle Anwesenden bereit.

Literaturangaben


Open4DE Spotlight on Finland – An advanced culture of openness shaped by the research community

Authors: Malte Dreyer, Martina Benz and Maike Neufend

Open Access (OA) is developing in an area of tension between institutional and funder policies, the economics of publishing and last but not least the communication practices of research disciplines. In a comparison across European countries, very dynamic and diverse approaches and developments can be observed. Furthermore, this international and comparative perspective helps us to assess the state of open access and open science (OA and OS) in Germany. In this series of Open4DE project blog posts, we will summarize what we have learned in our in-depth conversations with experts on developing and implementing nationwide Open Access strategies.

After starting this series with an article about Lithuania and Sweden, we now continue our journey around the Baltic Sea. Our next stop is Finland:

In a comparison of European Openness strategies, Finland stands out for its sophisticated system of coordinated policy measures. While other countries have a strategy that bundles different aspects of the Openness culture into one central policy, the Finnish model impresses with unity in diversity. The website of the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies, which was set up specifically to provide information on Open Science (OS), lists four national policies on OS and research in Finland. In addition to a policy for data and methods, a policy on open access to scholary publications and a policy on open education and educational ressources document activity at a high level. The openness culture in Finland targets all stages of scientific communication but also teaching and learning. In addition, a national information portal provides orientation on publication venues, projects and publicly funded technical infrastructures. It is an exemplary tool to get an overview of the constantly growing Open Access (OA) and OS ecosystem and its numerous products and projects.

OA&OS-culture in Finland

Such an advanced stage in the development of openness can only be achieved through the persistence of political goals. The basis for this is a political and scientific culture whose fundamental values favour the idea of openness. OS and OA are seen as aspects of a comprehensive, science-ethical framework that unites issues such as internationalisation, gender equality and integrity of science in the term “responsible science”. In its guidelines Responsible conduct of research and procedures for handling allegations of misconduct in Finland the Finnish National Board of Research Integrity (TENK) establishes this connection between responsible conduct in science and openness. The 2012 version which is still valid today states:

2. The methods applied for data acquisition as well as for research and evaluation, conform to scientific criteria and are ethically sustainable. When publishing the research results, the results are communicated in an open and responsible fashion that is intrinsic to the dissemination of scientific knowledge (highlighting by the authors of this article).

“Responsible Science is an umbrella-term. Policy-making under this umbrella is based on the integrity of scientists, not on judicial decisions and laws,” says Sami Niinimäki, contact person for OS at the Finnish Ministry of Science and interview partner of Open4DE. In his role as a counsellor of education in the department of higher education and science policy in the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture Sami Niinimäki is well-versed in all issues related to science and education, funding and evidence-based policy-making. Quality assurance is also a defining theme for the ministry’s activities, Sami says. We meet via zoom on a Friday at the end of March to talk about Finland’s Open Science policy for an hour. A early spring day in Helsinki, Sami Niinimäki tells about the history of Finnish OS and OA policy-making: 

Data as a starting point

“We started with the data. In other places, it begins with publications but in Finland we invested first in the data infrastructure” says Sami Niinimäki, naming a special feature of the development of OA in Finland right at the beginning of our conversation. First discussions about opening up science date back to the 1990s, when people were aware of the benefits of OA&OS but had not yet pushed ahead with the development at a larger scale. The topic became prominent in the 2000s when the ministry, which at that time was responsible for the system architecture of science communication, realised that open data also represented an exciting field of activity. The first ministerial initiative in this field began at the end of the decade and ran from 2009 to 2014. Among other things, it created the conditions for long-term digital preservation. Together with the open science and research initiative from 2013 to 2017, these programmes created infrastructures, researched scientific cultures and conducted surveys on the maturity of OA and OS developments. Researching the field led to a kind of friendly competition among institutional actors and, at the level of individual institutions, had the positive effect of making their own openness culture thematically and publicly transparent, Sami Niinimäki tells us.

From the Ministry to the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies

The actual policy process, in which research funders, universities, colleges and other institutions work on national policy documents, is today coordinated by the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies, a national co-operative body for learned societies in Finland. According to its own information, the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies has a membership of 293 societies and four academies from all branches of arts and sciences, in total 260 000 individual members, and also supports and develops the role of its members in science policy discussions. Expert groups on science policy issues meet under its umbrella, currently these are “The Committee for Public Information”, “The Finnish Advisory Board on Research Integrity”, which is under the self-governance of the scientific community, and the “Publication Forum”. In addition, the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies is active in creating roadmaps and organises so-called forum meetings. “The change of responsibility for our policy process from the Ministry to the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies was a kind of natural evolution”, Sami Niinimäki points out. But in retrospect, this development made total sense:

“The Federation of Finnish Learned Societies hosts the research integrity board since the 1990s and their work relies on the integrity in the research community: why not include OS in a visible way in the same package? Possibly this happened per accident, but we had to go through these steps to reach a higher maturity level. In the ministry we failed to reach the research community, our audience included the same 400 people we talked to every time and with the Federation, the message reached further audiences, even trade unions.”

The change of responsibilities, the inclusion of new actors and the re-organisation of running processes is nothing new in the eyes of policy research. According to Sybille Münch’s Research on Interpretative Policy-Analysis (2016), policy processes rarely run as smoothly as the theory of the policy cycle suggests. In the Finnish case, however, the change of responsibility seems to have been achieved with little loss: Even more, the linking of the policy process to the research-community has led to productive participation of the target group. A manageable time commitment combined with the prospect of influence motivates stakeholders to this day to help shape policy processes through active committee work, says Sami Niinimäki.

During the interview, we repeatedly learn how important a culture of participation is for the Finnish model. Exemplary is not only the management of the policy process through an organization which represents the interests of scientists, but also the implementation of Plan S, which was informed by an open consultation at the University of Helsinki.

Problems and challenges

Problems do exist, however. In Finland, for example, the implementation of the European guidelines on the secondary publication right has failed – initial attempts in this direction failed in particular because of the resistance of trade union and copyright lobby groups. Sami Niinimäki is convinced that resistance in the community can be broken by communicating the goals clearly – often resistance is caused by misunderstandings. However, Finland compensates the absence of a legal basis by consistency in practicing green OA. “Our goal is to publish national OA journals on a common platform in journal.fi” says Sami Niinimäki.

The important function of repositories in Finland is well known and has attracted attention from German colleagues before. But it is not only the infrastructure that is important: Sami Niinimäki mentions research funding as another important challenge in the implementation of OA. Moreover, ultimatively, it always comes down to the decisions of researchers: “Researchers understand that they have to produce impact and this gives incentives to use open copyright licences.” The fact that it all depends on the scientists also applies to research evaluation, a central field of work for policy-makers as Sami Niinimäki states:

“When you look at all the issues each of them lead to the core of the assessment  problem. This needs to be solved. In Finland we are on a good way, research organisations have signed the DORA-declaration and we have a national policy on research assessment, wich is very much compliant with DORA.”

With the signing of DORA, Finland is a step ahead of Germany: here, only a few research organisations have signed this document. But much more can be done also in Finland. Following Sami Niinimäki, it would be desirable for a peer review to be seen as equivalent to a publication. At the very least, a way should be found to also map these activities in reputation-building metrics. A proposal that not only seems relevant and attractive for Finland. The EU has already taken up this issue, among others in its scoping report on research assessment systems.

Taking stock: what can we learn from Finland?

The Finnish path shows that OA is favoured by a publishing culture in which repository-based OA became the standard early on. Participatory processes also promote acceptance in the long term. The fact that OA and OS are supported by broad acceptance is not least because of the numerous opportunities for participation through which stakeholders can get involved in policy processes. As mentioned above, the formulation and enforcement of the rules of research integrity is in the hands of the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies – an organization representing the scientists. The participatory implementation of PlanS, also mentioned above, is also evidence of a culture of participation. “Starting point is the openness and transparency of science as well as the mutual trust between researchers and research organisations. The model of self-regulation works well in democracies akin to Finland” is written on the webpage of the Finnish National Board on Research Integrity. At the same time, an accompanying, careful regulation is also beneficial, says Sami Niinimäki:

“Research funders can call the play, if research funders show maturity, then the organisations that benefit from their funding also change their culture. It is a domino process. And this dynamic also played out at the European level.”

Whereas in Finland the rule of government is “as much as necessary, as little as possible”, the rule of self-government is “as much as possible, as little as necessary”. This creates a domino effect that develops a momentum of its own. Now, of course, with regard to Germany, the question is which dominoes must fall here in order to further advance the process of conversion to OA. Finland shows that the connection to researchers is of particular importance. In Germany, unfortunately, the professional societies have not yet played a leading role in the conversion to OA. A workshop, which was held with representatives of the professional societies as part of the Open4DE project, showed that the interests and needs of the individual professional societies are also very different.  Last but not least, a representative body similar to the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies is missing here, which would bring these different interests under one roof. However, networking nodes such as the Open Access Network could play a strategically exposed role here. The future will show how feasible the already outlined ways of involving scientists in Germany are.

Literature

Open Science Coordination in Finnland, Federation of Finnished Learned Societies (2020). „Declaration for Open Science and Research (Finnland) 2020–2025.” Accessed June 7, 2022. https://edition.fi/tsv/catalog/view/79/29/192-1.

European Commission (2021). „Directorate-General for Research and Innovation, Towards a reform of the research assessment system: scoping report.” Accessed June 7, 2022. https://data.europa.eu/doi/10.2777/707440.

European University Association asbl. (without year). „The EUA Open Science Agenda 2025.” Accessed June 7, 2022. https://eua.eu/downloads/publications/eua%20os%20agenda.pdf.

Finnish Advisory Board on Research Integrity. „Responsible conduct of research and procedures for handling allegations of misconduct in Finland. Guidelines of the Finnish Advisory Board on Research Integrity 2012.” Accessed June 7, 2022. https://tenk.fi/sites/tenk.fi/files/HTK_ohje_2012.pdf.

Ilva, Jyrki (2020). „Open access on the rise at Finnish universities“. Accessed June 7, 2022. https://blogs.helsinki.fi/thinkopen/oa-statistics-2019/.

National Open Science and Research Steering Group und Science and Research Steering Group (2020). „National Policy and Executive Plan by the Research Community in Finland for 2020–2025.“ Accessed June 7, 2022. https://avointiede.fi/sites/default/files/2020-03/openaccess2019.pdf.

Ministry of Education and Culture (2019). „Atlas of Open Science and Research in Finland 2019 Evaluation of openness in the activities of higher education institutions, research institutes, research-funding organisations, Finnish academic and cultural institutes abroad and learned societies and academies Final report.” Accessed June 7, 2022. https://julkaisut.valtioneuvosto.fi/handle/10024/161990

Morka, Agata and Gatti, Rupert (2021). „Finland“. In Academic Libraries and Open Access Books in Europe: A Landscape Study. PubPub. Accessed June 7, 2022.  https://doi.org/10.21428/785a6451.2da5044f.

Münch, Sybille (2016). „Interpretative Policy-Analyse: eine Einführung. Lehrbuch.” Wiesbaden, doi: 10.1007/978-3-658-03757-4.

Open Science and Research Coordination (2019). „Open Access to Scholarly Publications. National Policy and Executive Plan by the Research Community in Finland for 2020–2025 (1).” Accessed June 7, 2022. https://doi.org/10.23847/isbn.9789525995343.

Ministry of Education and Culture (2014). „Open science and research leads to surprising discoveries and creative insights: Open science and research roadmap 2014–2017.” Accessed June 7, 2022. https://julkaisut.valtioneuvosto.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/75210/okm21.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y.

Pölönen, Janne; Laakso, Mikael; Guns, Raf; Kulczycki, Emanuel and Sivertsen, Gunnar (2020). „Open access at the national level: A comprehensive analysis of publications by Finnish researchers“. In: Quantitative Science Studies, 17, 1–39. Accessed June 7, 2022.  https://doi.org/10/gg927d.

Open4DE Spotlight on Sweden: How a Bottom-up Open Access Strategy Works without a National Policy

Authors: Malte Dreyer, Martina Benz and Maike Neufend

Open Access (OA) is developing in an area of tension between institutional and funder policies, the economics of publishing and last but not least the communication practices of research disciplines. In a comparison across European countries, very dynamic and diverse approaches and developments can be observed. Furthermore, this international and comparative perspective helps us to assess the state of open access and open science (OA and OS) in Germany. In this series of Open4DE project blog posts, we will summarize what we have learned in our in-depth conversations with experts on developing and implementing nationwide Open Access strategies. We continue our series with a report on Sweden’s Open Access landscape.

The Nordic and Baltic countries of Europe are renown for having developed Open Access and Open Science (OA and OS) particularly well. Our spotlight on Lithuania at the beginning of this series made clear that committed policy-making is an important precondition for the successful implementation of OA and OS. Finland, too, has created a sophisticated system of various national policy papers on opening up research and teaching. The policy process in which they were developed is itself a tool to promote openness in science. We will report on Finland’s strategy in this series in the coming weeks.

Sweden differs from its Baltic neighbors as it has not established a nation-wide binding OA strategy through a policy paper or law. Nevertheless, Sweden has always been on a very good path towards the goal of opening up science. Sweden was one of the early adopters of transformative agreements and today can build on a broad acceptance of OA in the scientific community – despite the lack of a national policy. How can this be?

We wanted to explore what strategies Sweden is applying to make OA and OS a breakthrough and met Wilhelm Widmark to talk to him about the Swedish research ecosystem. Wilhelm Widmark is the director of the Stockholm University Library and has played an important role developing OA and OS at his own institution. He has also been involved for years in various national committees for the implementation of OA and OS: He is Vice-Chairman of the Swedish Bibsam Consortium and member of the Swedish Rectors Conference’s Open Science working group. Internationally, he was a member of the LIBER  Steering Board and a member of EUA’s Expert Group on Open Science. Since December 2021, he has also been a director of the EOSC Association.

The history of OA in Sweden

The history of OA in Sweden is characterized by very committed people, Wilhelm Widmark points out at the beginning of our conversation. Main drivers have always been enthusiasts who cared about the idea. One could therefore conclude that OA in Sweden has traditionally come from bottom-up. According to Wilhelm Widmark, it was indeed library directors who started it all, not the government. In their exchange forum, the SUHF Rectors Conference, they developed a recommendation in 2003 to deal more intensively with OA in the future, because they saw this topic coming. The already ongoing journal crisis gave a necessary impetus and lent the whole development an additional ideological dimension. In view of the constantly rising prices, it also became clear to the scientists that OA and OS has a value in itself. With the help of the libraries, they first tried to go the green way and started using repositories. However, it quickly became apparent that the workload on researchers was too high to achieve success this way. Only between 10% and 15% OA could be achieved with repository-based OA. Around 2015, therefore, the discussion about Gold OA also began to rise up in Sweden.

The plan to enable OA through negotiations with publishers led to discussions in the rectors conference. It quickly became clear that this form of negotiation could only take place with the involvement of university management. The network that emerged soon spanned the entire country. Today, there is a steering committee in which university rectors and people from the university administrations are represented in addition to the library directors. The National Library of Sweden, where the steering committee is located, plays a significant role in the transformation process, unlike in Germany, for example. The success of this model speaks for itself: Sweden is already one of the countries with the most transformation agreements. By 2026, more than 80% of publications are expected to appear in Gold OA through transformative deals.

The future of OA and OS in Sweden

The OA transformation is an ongoing process with changing goals. Wilhelm Widmark seems to get thoughtful at this point: “The question is when one can claim that a transformation is complete”, he remarks and points to upcoming challenges. These include the common search for alternatives to commercial publication service providers. An alternative to commercial OA could lie in the design of a publication platform. The times seem right for such projects: “Publishers really want to keep the transformative agreements as their business model. But the researchers are really annoyed of the high level of the publication fees” is how Wilhelm Widmark describes the current mood in his country. And in his view, the tested interaction between infrastructure providers and scientists will also be decisive for the next stage of the development: “The university management has the question on their table and the EU is our political driver. But it shouldn’t be organized top-down, it must be driven by researchers. The transformation is done for the researchers and thus the process must be created based on the needs of the researchers.” Under these conditions, the coordinating side needs to address the task of creating structures that promote and enable this cultural change.

Wilhelm Widmark believes that the involvement of all stakeholders is also necessary in those areas where he believes Sweden still has potential for development. Here he mentions, among other things, the topic of open data and especially the monitoring of opening processes in this area, investments in digital infrastructures, the promotion of citizen science or the topic of open educational resources. Furthermore, investments should not only be made in material resources, but also in skills. Universities in particular are called upon to provide competent support for researchers through data stewards and their own training programs. But the training of trainers must also be further professionalised and accredited: “We need a curriculum for data stewards and career paths for this staff. Not only the infrastructure is important, the skills are almost as important as the infrastructure,” Wilhelm Widmark is convinced.

Sweden and the National Policy Plan

The deep conviction that policy processes must be thought of from the implementation point of view and should be shaped by the players who are at the beginning of the scientific value chain corresponds to a critical attitude towards national policies. In contrast, a national OA and OS policy developed with all stakeholders, as is currently being discussed in Sweden, runs the risk of becoming self-serving and binding important capacities: “In the beginning the government wanted an OA and OS policy. The research council and the national library suggested a common OS policy together with the universities and the directors. But I am not sure if it is the right thing to do because it will take a long time and the work to be done is actually more important than the policy itself.”

What we can learn from Sweden

In our conversation, it becomes clear to us what maxims this openness-strategy follows: Prescriptions from above are avoided. Instead, common ground is identified through discussions with all participants and differences are not emphasized. In order to achieve goals that everyone considers desirable, the tools for their implementation are decided at each individual institution or organisation. In this way, specific needs can be addressed and researchers and educators have the opportunity to participate directly in these policy processes. On the last point, the Swedish strategy seems similar to the approach taken in Germany.

The price of this autonomy and particularism at the institutional level is a great heterogeneity of measures. Wilhelm Widmark sees this himself: “The national library compared all the different OA policies, and they are not aligned at all”. But he continues straight away: “Everything important happens at the universities. And of course the research field provides norms, but the researchers are not really interested in these norms but care about what is going on at their universities.” The benefit of such a strategy is that the discussion about OA and OS is kept alive. Perhaps this effect has also contributed to the fact that OA and OS have been met with such broad acceptance in Sweden.

Further Reading